eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Continuing with the Easter holidays theme, here is a great eco-friendly easter egg alternative you can make, or get your kids to make on a wet (or snowy, as it is at the moment!) afternoon:

I’m not too big on giving my daughter too much chocolate, she gets a little bit, but we do try to limit what she eats, so Easter with it’s influx of chocolate does pose a little bit of a problem.  It’s not just the chocolate: Easter also poses an eco-friendly issue.   Easter eggs are one of the most overly packaged items on the shop shelf.  A typical egg will be housed in an elaborate box, a large plastic mould and wrapped in foil.  The egg itself will typically contain a plastic bag full of yet more sweets.

Trying to come up with a healthy eco-friendly Easter egg alternative called for some creative thinking and head scratching.  After a bit of brainstorming I found a set of four wooden two-part eggs for a few pounds (available here).  Then armed with a bundle of scrap fabric and a lot of glue I decoupaged the eggs to create some eggs that can be filled with any item of your choosing –  such as crayons or healthy treats.  The best part is that these can be refilled, and will last for many Easters to come, making these a fantastic eco-friendly Easter egg alternative!

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

It’s really easy to decoupage, and a great fun activity for kids.  You will need:

easter egg diy

Instructions:

  • Cut some scrap fabric into 1cm squared squares.
  • Mixed 1 part PVA glue with 1 part water in a bowl.  Give the glue and water a good mix with your finger, or an old paintbrush.
  • Separate your wooden eggs into two parts and sit them on a protected surface.
  • Dunk your fabric squares into the PVA glue/water mix, giving them a good soaking.  Squeeze out any excess water/glue then apply to your egg.  Smooth out any creases with your finger as you go.
  • Make sure you cover up all bits of wood with your fabric.
  • Leave to dry overnight.
  • Glue a ribbon or trim in place if desired.

I tried a patchwork effect on my first egg but wasn’t so keen with how it came out, so I stuck to one fabric per egg.

You could also paint the eggs using acrylic paints, or draw on them using sharpies or gel pens, however my painting skills are not up to scratch, which is why I went for decoupage.  If you’re a dab hand with a paintbrush or pen, or your kids would rather paint than decoupage,  then here are some stylish examples of painted eggs that I found at Blank Goods:

easy easter crafts

easter craft ideas

You could also use washi tape, like these ones from Bliss Bloom:

easter egg decorating ideas

If you’re handy with a crotchet hook, you could even make these lovely eggs, spotted at Red Heart:

crochet eggs diy

These would be great for a kids egg hunt!

There you have it, lots of lovely eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives to traditional chocolate Easter eggs that have the added bonus of being a bit healthier too!

can eating insects save the world

Can Eating Insects Save The World?

can eating insects save the world

Last night I caught an interesting documentary on BBC4 – ‘Can Eating Insects Save The World?’ – and it provoked lots of interesting discussion in our house about eating insects.

Presenter Stefan Gates travels to Thailand and Cambodia, where the consumption of spiders (including tarantulas) and insects is not only commonplace, but often a delicacy which commands high prices.  Yet here in the West if insects are found in a restaurant it’s a call to Environmental Health department of the local council.

It is estimated that thee are 40 tonnes of insects to every human (which if you do the maths is an incomprehensible amount of insects!), yet billions of people on earth are starving and malnourished.  At the same time the farming of livestock for meat for the rich diverts thousands of tonnes of grain out of the food chain, further exacerbating global food inequalities .  Stefan asks if the solution is for everyone – the British included – to start eating insects too.

We personally thought that eating insects would be no different to eating prawns – both are arthropods – and are low in fat and full of protein making them healthy alternatives to meat.  Insects are less likely to be contaminated (as in the recent beef/horse meat scandal).  Insects also lay eggs in massive quantities, and have short breeding hatching and growing times – in the case of crickets it takes 45 days from egg to fully grown cricket – meaning it is possible to generate huge quantities of insects in very short timescales compared to livestock, in a much much smaller and less resource and labour intensive manner.

However, and it’s a big however,  like many I’m really not keen on spiders (after an unfortunate incident – I’ll spare you the details in case you’re squeamish!), and can’t imagine ever having the guts to give eating insects a go!

What do you think?  Should we as a nation get over our fears and start eating insects?  Would you personally eat insects?