Tag

eggs

Food & Drink, Food Waste Tips

Easy Egg Freshness Test

egg freshness test

Hey friend!  I’ve got a really easy egg freshness test for you today, that’s really handy to keep up your sleeve so that you can avoid binning perfectly edible eggs.

In our house we always have eggs to hand.  Unfortunately we don’t always manage to use up all of the eggs before their reach their best before date.  I used to throw them away when they got to this point, because, you know, that’s what the date said.

Now, as you know I hate food waste, and really loathed to throw the unused eggs out, but what else could you do?  Well, when my other half and I first moved in together he showed me a great tip to test egg freshness, that I thought I’d share with you today:

Easy Egg Freshness Test

old egg

An egg two weeks past it’s best before date

To test egg freshness all you have to do is take your egg, and gently place it in a large glass of cold water:

egg glass water test

It sank so it’s safe to eat!

Eggs suitable for eating will sink to the bottom of the glass; eggs that float to the surface have gone off and must not be eaten.  It’s as easy as that to test egg freshness!  So even though my egg says best before 11th July it suggests it’s still safe to eat.  I took these photos on the 28th of July, in case you’re wondering.  With any egg past it’s best before date though, do ensure it’s cooked thoroughly before eating (due to a salmonella risks).

I’ll admit, I was skeptical, and felt a bit distrusting of the first egg I ate that had passed it’s best before date, but did I get ill?  No.  And have I ever been ill from an egg since we moved in together six years ago?  No.  So it’s tried and trusted, let me assure you of that!  Even the NHS say you can eat eggs after their best before date.  Again, just cook it thoroughly.

If in any doubt, the smell and look of the egg once you’ve cracked it open will also let you know if it’s suitable for consumption.  Everyone knows what a rotten egg smells like, and if it’s off the yolk will also be lying flat (rather than slightly raised) and the albumen will be very runny, almost like water.

Would you eat an egg past it’s expiration date?  Or do you have any other food tips?  Do share in the comments below!

Arts & Crafts, Children, Families, Life & Style

Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Continuing with the Easter holidays theme, here is a great eco-friendly easter egg alternative you can make, or get your kids to make on a wet (or snowy, as it is at the moment!) afternoon:

I’m not too big on giving my daughter too much chocolate, she gets a little bit, but we do try to limit what she eats, so Easter with it’s influx of chocolate does pose a little bit of a problem.  It’s not just the chocolate: Easter also poses an eco-friendly issue.   Easter eggs are one of the most overly packaged items on the shop shelf.  A typical egg will be housed in an elaborate box, a large plastic mould and wrapped in foil.  The egg itself will typically contain a plastic bag full of yet more sweets.

Trying to come up with a healthy eco-friendly Easter egg alternative called for some creative thinking and head scratching.  After a bit of brainstorming I found a set of four wooden two-part eggs for a few pounds (available here).  Then armed with a bundle of scrap fabric and a lot of glue I decoupaged the eggs to create some eggs that can be filled with any item of your choosing –  such as crayons or healthy treats.  The best part is that these can be refilled, and will last for many Easters to come, making these a fantastic eco-friendly Easter egg alternative!

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

It’s really easy to decoupage, and a great fun activity for kids.  You will need:

easter egg diy

Instructions:

  • Cut some scrap fabric into 1cm squared squares.
  • Mixed 1 part PVA glue with 1 part water in a bowl.  Give the glue and water a good mix with your finger, or an old paintbrush.
  • Separate your wooden eggs into two parts and sit them on a protected surface.
  • Dunk your fabric squares into the PVA glue/water mix, giving them a good soaking.  Squeeze out any excess water/glue then apply to your egg.  Smooth out any creases with your finger as you go.
  • Make sure you cover up all bits of wood with your fabric.
  • Leave to dry overnight.
  • Glue a ribbon or trim in place if desired.

I tried a patchwork effect on my first egg but wasn’t so keen with how it came out, so I stuck to one fabric per egg.

You could also paint the eggs using acrylic paints, or draw on them using sharpies or gel pens, however my painting skills are not up to scratch, which is why I went for decoupage.  If you’re a dab hand with a paintbrush or pen, or your kids would rather paint than decoupage,  then here are some stylish examples of painted eggs that I found at Blank Goods:

easy easter crafts

easter craft ideas

You could also use washi tape, like these ones from Bliss Bloom:

easter egg decorating ideas

If you’re handy with a crotchet hook, you could even make these lovely eggs, spotted at Red Heart:

crochet eggs diy

These would be great for a kids egg hunt!

There you have it, lots of lovely eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives to traditional chocolate Easter eggs that have the added bonus of being a bit healthier too!