blog round up

Ten Things

link round up blog

Hello!  How are you?  Things are great here – our builder is finishing up work on our house this week, marking the end of two months of us sleeping in our living room.  I’m so excited about the prospect of having a bedroom back!  School holidays start here this week too so the idea of no homework, no ironing of school uniforms, and no having to get out the house early is very well received.  Whether I’ll be saying these things in 7 weeks time is anyone’s guess though…!

This week’s links:

1.  Asos is to ban products made from/with silk, cashmere, feathers, and mohair from its website, by the end of January 2019, for ethical reasons.

2.  As a follow-up to this article, Quartz asked should silk be the next product that conscious consumers should give up?

3.  Shoppers are turning away from leather shoes, but it’s causing problems.

4.  The most interesting thing I read this week was this article on how to eat like a chef for less than £20 a week.  A great look into a sustainable yet thrifty diet Top tips?  Shop seasonally and use up every part of your food, even the scraps.

5.  MPs are to examine the environmental footprint of the UK fashion industry.  Hopefully, this means change is afoot.

6.  H&M are reopening their Paris flagship store after 18 months of renovations, and it will be the first store to permanently feature H&M’s “Take Care” service.  This service allows customers to repair their clothes in-store, buy garment-care products and get advice on how to take better care of their pieces.  Exciting.

7.  In other exciting news, residents in Graz, Austria are to be offered up to 100 euros a year to repair their items instead of binning them.

8.  The microbead ban comes into force in England and Scotland on Tuesday!  The next step is surely banning plastic based glitter.

9.  There’s a CO2 crisis, but it’s not what you think.  Instead of too much CO2, now there is too little.  You can’t make this stuff up!

10.  Hemp still gets a bad rap, but this article furthers the case for hemp.  This time, you don’t have to wear it if you don’t want to, just plant it on contaminated land.  That being said, hemp has come an incredibly long way since the festival fashions people wore in my youth, and I would totally wear this hemp beauty* in a heartbeat.

Enjoy the rest of your weekend!

Wendy.x

1 comment

  1. Surely banning all these natural fibres is ridiculous as being natural they are also sustainable, especially silk, as it comes from silk worms which cannot possibly be ‘sentient beings ‘ in any realistic sense. What are people going to do – wear polyester and acrylic instead of wool, and contribute to more plastic micro fragments in the oceans? I really think ASOS and their customers need to think about this in a bit more depth. For example, how is a plastic button better than a completely renewable mother-of- pearl one?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *