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Arts & Crafts, Life & Style

How to Make Beeswax Wraps Cheaply & Easily

beeswax food wrap diy

Are you looking to make beeswax food wraps? Let me show you just how easy and cheap it can be with this full DIY guide.

Hello!  It’s been a little while since I shared a DIY with you, but today I want to share my tried and tested technique for how to make beeswax wraps.  If you’re looking to reduce your single-use plastic consumption, then these beeswax wraps make for a great alternative to using cling film, tin foil, or plastic Tupperware to store food in.  And the best part is they are really easy to make.

We actually stopped using cling film and tin foil a long time ago.  We switched to using parchment paper to wrap our food in before popping it in the fridge or freezer or storing food in glass jars or Tupperware tubs.

All of this has been doing the job pretty well.  However, I’ve been trying to find an alternative to parchment paper as I’d like to be able to not buy so many single-use products, like parchment paper.  I also wanted to find a way to transport my lunch without the need for bulky Tupperware tubs.  Those things are a pain to carry around all day!  So, lo and behold, the answer I was looking for: the beeswax food wrap!

how to make beeswax wraps

I had seen some pretty nice ones for sale online, but the statutory maternity pay I’m on at the moment sadly doesn’t quite stretch to beeswax wraps.  I had some fabric scraps left over from an old craft project.  And I also some beeswax pellets leftover from making beeswax candles and homemade nappy rash cream so decided to try my hand at making my own.  How hard could it be? Turns out, not very hard at all.  Let me share with you now my easy method on how to make beeswax wraps.

how to store food without plastic

How to Make Beeswax Wraps

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You will need

Freshly washed and dried fabric scraps* – a variety of sizes.

Beeswax pellets*

A silicone basting brush*

Oven tray

Tongs*

Method

Preheat your oven to 85°C (185°F)

Lay your piece of fabric flat on your oven tray.  Sprinkle the fabric liberally with your beeswax pellets.

Place in the oven for around 5 minutes, until the beeswax has all melted.  Keep an eye on it the whole time to avoid burning.

Once all the beeswax has melted remove the tray from the oven and quickly use your silicone basting brush to evenly distribute the beeswax.  The beeswax will start to set as soon as you take it out of the oven so you want to do this bit very quickly.

As soon as you’ve done this use the tongs to remove the fabric and hang it up to dry.  It will take only minutes to set and then it’s ready for use. To do this, using the tongs, I hold my fabric above the tray for a minute to allow the beeswax to set (and to catch any drips), then I drape the fabric on my washing line.

If you find you’ve got too much beeswax on your fabric then simply place it back in the oven for a few minutes until the beeswax has melted. Then brush down with your silicone brush again.

To remove the beeswax from your oven tray and basting brush, wash them in hot soapy water.

Have fun making these beeswax wraps – I find it can get a bit addictive!

How to use beeswax wraps

You can use beeswax wraps in practically any way you see fit – for example wrapping cheese.  Just wrap the cheese in the wrap and use the heat from your hands to seal the ends.  Got a leftover bowl of food?  Simply place a beeswax wrap on top and again, using the heat from your hands, seal the wrap around the edges.  The uses are endless!

See my notes on usage below for some more handy hints.

Beeswax Snack Pouches

how to fold beeswax wraps

My eldest daughter loves the little snack boxes of raisins.  I’ve found it’s cheaper and less wasteful on the packaging front to buy a big 1 kg bag of raisins and make my own little snack packs of raisins using the beeswax food wraps and a bit of origami.

how to fold beeswax wraps uk

1. Take a square of beeswax coated fabric and fold diagonally, as in picture two.

2.  Fold down the left-hand corner, as in picture 3.

3.  Next, fold down the left-hand corner like in picture 4, lining up the edge with the previous fold.

4.  Now fold down the triangle that’s sticking up at the top.

5.  Flip it over and fold down the other triangle.

6. Finally, open it up and fill it with raisins or any other snack of your choice

To seal, fold down the flap on the side that doesn’t have any folds in it. Then you are good to go!

origami fold

Beeswax Wraps Usage Tips

There are a few points to remember when using beeswax wraps.

Heat & Cold Considerations

Firstly, the most important thing to remember is beeswax melts at a low-ish temperature. To be precise, the melting point of beeswax is around 62°C to 64°C. Therefore, any use that is going to be around or above that temperature is a big no-no.  Think cold.

I, therefore, wouldn’t recommend using your wrap directly on hot food.  Let the food cool first before wrapping it.

And like cling film, your beeswax wrap is for food storage only. Don’t use them in your oven or microwave.  The beeswax will melt and will leave a big mess that will not be fun to clean up.

You can freeze your fabric wraps.  I wouldn’t use it for long-term freezer storage though – only for the food that you plan on freezing in the short term.  I would suggest that your wraps spend no longer than one month at a time in the freezer.

How To Wash Beeswax Wraps

With these heat considerations in mind, wash your beeswax food wrap in cold soapy water using a gentle eco-friendly washing-up liquid, like Bio D*.  I would avoid using alcohol-based washing-up liquid as it can degrade your beeswax.  I would also recommend leaving your wraps to air dry. Whatever you do, don’t leave them on your radiator to dry!

I also wouldn’t recommend putting your wraps in your dishwasher or washing machine.  And definitely not your tumble drier!

beeswax food wrap

Food Safety

If you eat meat, then I would avoid placing your beeswax wrap in direct contact with raw meat. This is because you can’t wash your wrap in hot water to sterilise it.  If you want to store raw meat using your wrap, I would put the meat in a bowl and use the wrap to cover the bowl.

What To Do When Your Wrap Stops Folding

When your beeswax food wrap stops losing the ability to fold, simply wash and re-wax it in the same manner as above.

How to make beeswax wraps cheaply and easily
Arts & Crafts, Life & Style

How to Make Beeswax Tealight Candles

how to make beeswax tealight candles

Let me show you how to make beeswax tealight candles!

I find January to be such a dark month, especially once the Christmas lights have been packed away.  I always think we need a bit of light and sparkle to get us through the month.  So, at the weekend I experimented with making my own beeswax tealight candles.

It was so easy and successful (for a crafting novice like myself!) that I’ve put together a simple easy guide on how to make beeswax tealights for you.  Hopefully, it will help brighten up your month too.

I always assumed that making candles would be difficult or would require some specialist equipment or tools.  The good news is that you don’t!  In fact, you can make these beautiful beeswax tealight candles in about twenty minutes flat in your own kitchen.  The best bit is you don’t need any specialist equipment.  Nothing more than some basic candle making supplies, an old tin can, and a saucepan of water will suffice!

How to Make Beeswax Tealight Candles

ecofriendly tealights

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Ingredients

4 metal or ceramic containers I used old pie tins found on eBay*.
Approximately 300g beeswax pellets* for four tealights
4 petroleum-free candle wicks with sustainers*
Clean tin can
Saucepan
Newspaper
Bamboo Skewers

Instructions

To gauge how many pellets you need per holder, simply fill your container with beeswax pellets. Pour these into the tin can, and then repeat, as I found that to get the right amount of wax you need double the amount of pellets that your container can hold.

natural beeswax pellets

Put some newspaper down to protect your work surface.
 
Put your tin can containing the pellets into a small saucepan of boiling water, and keep boiling. Just take care not to get any water into your can.
 
Whilst the pellets are heating in the can, stir with a bamboo skewer to help the wax break down into a liquid. It should take around 15-20 minutes to completely liquefy.
 
Once the wax has completely liquefied turn off the hob.  Next, using an oven glove, very very carefully lift the hot can out of the water.  Now slowly pour the wax into your container. Take extreme care with this as the wax will be very very hot.

candle-making-on-hob

Add your wick.  It may need support with a skewer until the wax starts to firm up again.

candle-making

Once the candles have hardened trim your wick to no more than 1cm in height.

beeswax-candle-tealight-diy

Burn as you would any other candle.

candle-DIY

As with any candles always burn on a heat-resistant surface, and never leave a burning candle unattended.

Variations on Beeswax Tealight Candles

You can use any metal or ceramic container that you like for these beeswax tealight candles.  I picked up these old metal pies tins on eBay last year and have been hoarding them until I could decide how best to use them.  However, I saw that Artemis of Junkaholique made candles in enamel mugs that looked really pretty too.  I’ve also seen candles made in teacups before.  And you could even use tin cans for extra recycling points!

If you want to make scented beeswax tealight candles you could add some essential oils to the pellets as you’re melting them down.  Lavender is one scent that immediately springs to mind that could be really nice!

I think these beeswax tealight candles would make a lovely eco-friendly gift idea.  I kind of wish I had thought to make them before Christmas, but hey, it’s a good excuse to keep them all to myself!

If you have any beeswax leftover, then these beeswax wraps are another really easy and practical make.

beeswax candle DIY

Here’s to a light and bright January!

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