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Children, Families

Recycled Craft Ideas For Kids

recycled craft ideas for kids

recycled craft ideas for kids

It’s half term this week and if you’re running out of things to keep your kids occupied then I’ve got some great, free recycled craft ideas for kids made from the contents of your recycling bin for your kids to tackle.  All the crafts are super fun and great for nursery school aged kids and up (although adult supervision and in some cases, help, is definitely require).

Here are the six craft ideas, shared with me by Ecomarket, an ethical community of like-minded eco-lovers and eco stall-holders selling earth friendly products, for Moral Fibres readers:

1. Tin Can Telephone

tin can telephone kids diy craft

The old favourite.  This one needs a fair bit of help from adults, but is great fun.  Wash out two tin cans (that ideally have been opened with a smooth edge tin can opener to avoid any sharp edges.  Although covering the edge with tape is good too) and use a nail and hammer to make a hole in the bottom. Tie a long bit of string between the two (with the knot on the inside of the can) and start talking.

 

2. Tin Can Stilts

tin can stilts

Sticking with cans for the moment, they also make great stilts.  Larger tins are best for older kids if you have them, otherwise stick to small cans for littler people. Again, an adult is needed here: use a nail and hammer to make two holes on the bottom edge and try a loop of string through for your kids to hold on to. The decoration is then all down to your kids.

 

3. Toilet Roll Owls

toilet roll craft ideas

Empty toilet roll tubes make great owls. Simple push two edges together at one end to make the ears and then grab a pen and start colouring, or some coloured paper and start cutting and sticking.  You can even hang them up afterwards with some string.

4. Plastic Bottle Bowling

ideas for plastic bottles

If you happen to have a couple of plastic bottles in your recycling (I like a bit of sparking water now and again – a guilty pleasure – so often have a plastic bottle kicking about in the recycling bin) then collect them up to make your own bowling set. Kids can decorate the outside however they like (although a fun way is to squirt a bit of paint inside, screw the lid on tight and then get your kids to shake it until the inside is completely coated) and when they’re done, line them up and use a light ball as your bowl.  Striiiiiike!

 

5. Bottle Cap Memory Game

recycle bottle lids

You’ll need quite a collection of identical bottle caps for this game. Inside each one stick a bit of paper with a number on, or a small picture (as long as you have a duplicate). Use each number/image twice and then lay them out neatly. You turn over two each go and the aim of the game is to pick two of the same. When you’ve picked a pair, take them out the game and keep on going. The person with the most pairs at the end wins.

 

6. Tin Can Drums

craft ideas for tin cans

Another old favourite.  A drum, made from a tin can and a balloon.  You can add some stale rice into the mix too if you’re in the market for a headache, or if you’ve got a babysitter/grandparents coming round!  Add a handful of rice or lentils to your empty can.  Cut the end off the balloon and then stretch this over the top of your can.  Secure it in place with an elastic band.  Some chop sticks or skeweres will make good drumsticks.  However you might want to cover the ends of the sticks with large balls of plasticine or blue tac to stop them from poking their eyes.

Happy crafting!

What are your favourite craft ideas for kids?

 

 

Images: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7

Arts & Crafts, Children, Families, Life & Style

Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Continuing with the Easter holidays theme, here is a great eco-friendly easter egg alternative you can make, or get your kids to make on a wet (or snowy, as it is at the moment!) afternoon:

I’m not too big on giving my daughter too much chocolate, she gets a little bit, but we do try to limit what she eats, so Easter with it’s influx of chocolate does pose a little bit of a problem.  It’s not just the chocolate: Easter also poses an eco-friendly issue.   Easter eggs are one of the most overly packaged items on the shop shelf.  A typical egg will be housed in an elaborate box, a large plastic mould and wrapped in foil.  The egg itself will typically contain a plastic bag full of yet more sweets.

Trying to come up with a healthy eco-friendly Easter egg alternative called for some creative thinking and head scratching.  After a bit of brainstorming I found a set of four wooden two-part eggs for a few pounds (available here).  Then armed with a bundle of scrap fabric and a lot of glue I decoupaged the eggs to create some eggs that can be filled with any item of your choosing –  such as crayons or healthy treats.  The best part is that these can be refilled, and will last for many Easters to come, making these a fantastic eco-friendly Easter egg alternative!

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

It’s really easy to decoupage, and a great fun activity for kids.  You will need:

easter egg diy

Instructions:

  • Cut some scrap fabric into 1cm squared squares.
  • Mixed 1 part PVA glue with 1 part water in a bowl.  Give the glue and water a good mix with your finger, or an old paintbrush.
  • Separate your wooden eggs into two parts and sit them on a protected surface.
  • Dunk your fabric squares into the PVA glue/water mix, giving them a good soaking.  Squeeze out any excess water/glue then apply to your egg.  Smooth out any creases with your finger as you go.
  • Make sure you cover up all bits of wood with your fabric.
  • Leave to dry overnight.
  • Glue a ribbon or trim in place if desired.

I tried a patchwork effect on my first egg but wasn’t so keen with how it came out, so I stuck to one fabric per egg.

You could also paint the eggs using acrylic paints, or draw on them using sharpies or gel pens, however my painting skills are not up to scratch, which is why I went for decoupage.  If you’re a dab hand with a paintbrush or pen, or your kids would rather paint than decoupage,  then here are some stylish examples of painted eggs that I found at Blank Goods:

easy easter crafts

easter craft ideas

You could also use washi tape, like these ones from Bliss Bloom:

easter egg decorating ideas

If you’re handy with a crotchet hook, you could even make these lovely eggs, spotted at Red Heart:

crochet eggs diy

These would be great for a kids egg hunt!

There you have it, lots of lovely eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives to traditional chocolate Easter eggs that have the added bonus of being a bit healthier too!