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Families

Babies, Children, Families, Teenagers, Whole Family

8 Places to Buy Ethical Kids Clothes in 2022

Here are eight great places to buy ethical kids clothes. From super sustainable secondhand clothes to organically and ethically sourced clothing, from birth to age 14.

Something I get HEAPS of emails about is where to buy ethical kids clothes. As a mum of two girls, I understand your frustration in not being able to easily find ethical clothes for your growing children.

There are loads of organic and sustainable baby clothes companies out there. However, when it comes to kids older than toddlers then options for ethical kids clothing starts to diminish. By the time you get to age 10, it’s a pretty sparse picture. What I will say is that if you are thinking about going into business making and selling organic babywear then stop right there. Instead, consider making older kids’ clothing instead, where there is a massive gap in the market.

Where to Buy Ethical Kids Clothes

That being said, there are a number of places to buy ethical and sustainable clothes for kids from birth to age 14. My kids are aged 6 and 10 so we haven’t had to navigate the teenage years yet, but I’ll share as many tips as I can to cover dressing babies, toddlers, kids, and teenagers ethically.

where to shop for ethical kids clothes

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1. eBay

eBay* is one of my all-time favourites for ethical kids’ clothing. There’s nothing more ethical than secondhand clothing, so eBay is brilliant if you want to shop ethically but on a tight budget.

eBay is also a great place to stock up on clothes for older kids and teenagers too – just make sure you click the used filter at the side.

One thing I particularly love eBay for is the fact that parents sell bundles of clothes that their kid has grown out of. Just search, for example, “girls bundle age 3 4“* and you can find hundreds and hundreds of bundles of clothing. Here you can pick up practically everything your kid will need in one parcel for very little.

If you really want to get the most for your money then my top eBay thrifty trick is to stock up on winter wear in the summertime, when fewer people are searching and bidding on winter wear. And likewise, searching for summer gear in winter is a superb way to grab some great bargains. I’ve also got lots of eBay tips this way.

2. Charity Shops for Ethical Kids Clothes

My other favourite place to shop ethically for kids is in charity shops. I’m really lucky to have a Barnados charity shop near me that exclusively sells kids’ wear and gear. I’ve come out of there with a pile of fantastic clothes for my kids and spent a little over £10.

If the charity shops near you don’t cater much for kids then Oxfam Online* is a super place to shop for secondhand ethical kids’ clothes online. Here you’ll find sizes ranging from birth to age 16.

Delivery is a flat fee of £3.95, no matter how many items you buy. What’s more, they also offer free returns making Oxfam Online a hassle way to shop for ethical kids’ clothes.

3. Frugi

frugi kids ethical clothing

Frugi* is a great stop if you are looking to buy some new ethical pieces. Catering for babies and kids up to age 10, Frugi’s bright and colourful clothes are made from organic and ethically sourced cotton.

All their outwear is made from recycled plastic bottles, which is great. However, you may want to buy a Guppyfriend for washing*, as these types of materials do release microfibres when washed.

Offering free delivery and an easy returns policy, it’s an easy way to shop from home.

4. Toby Tiger

toby tiger ethical kids clothes

Toby Tiger* is another ethical kids’ online shop that’s big on colour. Their ethical and GOTS certified organic cotton kidswear (this post explains what GOTS certified, and other sustainable labeling means), which I really appreciate not being labelled as for girls or for boys, is for kids aged up to six years old.

5. Etsy for Ethical Kids Clothes

organic kids tshirts

If you’re looking to shop directly from independent makers then Etsy* is the place for you. Here you’ll find great ethical kidswear from makers like Wiltshire-based Lost Shapes*. Lost Shapes sell colourful kids organic, environmentally friendly, and fairly traded t-shirts and jumpers. These come in sizes up to age 14, with prices starting from just £8.

6. The QT

The QT* has designed their ethical clothing for kids, aged 2 to 10, with circularity in mind, They aim for their clothing to be as close to 100% organic, natural, recyclable, and compostable as possible. From the fabric – 100% GOTS certified organic cotton – right down to the small details, such as the tags, threads, and buttons. Even the packaging is considered. Each garment comes in a fully compostable and biodegradable bag, which can be repurposed as a food waste caddy liner.

If your kids wear their QT Apparel clothes out beyond repair, then don’t worry. QT Apparel accepts QT Apparel clothing for recycling. You’ll even get a 20% discount voucher to use on your next purchase.

Sign up to the QT Apparel mailing list and get 15% off your first order.

7. Tootsa

tootsa ethical kids clothes

Finally, Tootsa (formerly known as Tootsa MacGinty) is a wonderful online shop selling ethical and largely unisex knitwear and other kids’ clothes in baby to age 10. And Tootsa even does a small adult line if you want to twin with your kids…!

Years ago I bought two jumpers for my eldest – which have since been handed down to my youngest – and these are still going strong, and still looking like new.

If your piece isn’t faring so well, then Tootsa offers a repair service. Here they’ll do their best to find a solution to keep your favourite Tootsa clothes going for longer. They’ll send you buttons, trims, patches and cover the cost of replacing a zipper if needs be. Failing all of that, you can send your old Tootsa clothes back to them in exchange for a discount on your next order.

Tootsa does fantastic sales, periodically. It’s a good idea to sign up to their mailing list or follow on social media to keep updated.

8. Polarn O Pyret

Catering from birth up to age 12, Polarn O Pyret* makes ethical kids clothes in a range of sustainable materials. From GOTS certified organic cotton to organic wool and more. All of their clothes are designed to last. In fact, Polarn O. Pyret says that every garment is made to last at least 3 children, if not many more.

Polarn O. Pyret also has many great sustainability measures in place too.  They offer a free repairs service to fix zips and replace broken poppers on all of their outerwear garments. This is regardless of when they were purchased.

They have also recently introduced a buy-back scheme. Here, when your child grows out of their Polarn O. Pyret clothes, they will help you find a new owner for it. In return, you’ll receive a voucher to use on new items online. At the moment, this only applies to outerwear, such as jackets and rain trousers. Hopefully, this may expand in the future to all of their clothes. I’ll keep you updated.

I hope this is helpful in your search for places to buy ethical kid’s clothes! Have I missed any of your favourites? And do check out my post on how to buy kid’s clothes that last for some useful pointers.

Babies, Families

Eco by Naty Nappies Review | AD

cloth versus disposable nappies

This Eco by Naty nappies review is paid-for content.

Time has flown around here.  It feels like my youngest daughter should still be a six-month-old baby. However, she is, in fact, two now. Two and a half to be precise. And she is very much a walking, talking toddler with a very definite mind of her own.  

We have been using reusable nappies on her since she was big enough to fit into them. Therefore I would imagine that our time with reusable nappies and nappies, in general, is drawing to a close soon.

This is our fourth year of using the same set of nappies. I bought the set over six years ago when my eldest daughter was only months old. So I feel we’ve really got our money’s worth out of them.  I paid about £160 for our nappies, which was a HUGE expense for us at the time.  I was so worried that I would never recoup that investment.  Thankfully it turned out those worries were unfounded – these nappies have been well used!

washable nappies

Don’t You Have to Exclusively Use Reusable Nappies?

As I have used reusable nappies on both my children, I often get asked questions about reusable nappies from people who are either interested in using them on their kids/future kids. I also get questions from people who have no inclination of using reusable nappies but are just curious as to how it all works. 

The chief reusable nappy question I get, hands down, is: “is it not a lot of work”?

I always answer with not as much work as you think.  All that reusable nappies really involve is just popping the dirty nappies in the nappy bucket, which is lined with a mesh bag.  When the bucket is full, just pop the mesh bag in the washing machine. Then pop on a 60°C wash. Then you just hang them up to dry when the cycle is done.  Job done.

Which Is Better?

The second question I get is “which is better, cloth or disposable nappies“?

I don’t think though, that it is a question of cloth versus disposable nappies.  Whenever I chat to people about reusable nappies, I’m keen to stress that reusable nappies don’t have to be all or nothing.  The cloth versus disposable nappy debate seems to perpetuate that it is all or nothing. I think this can be a bit of a barrier to getting new parents to think about using reusable nappies.  

My experience is that I don’t use reusable nappies on my daughter 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This is because I’ve found it’s just not practical for us. 

At night-time, I’ve found with both my daughters that we needed to use a disposable nappy (especially more so now that she’s older).  I have tried using extra pads in the reusable nappies, to no avail. I have conceded that disposable nappies at night time it is.

When we go away overnight I use disposables then too.  We mostly use public transport when going away overnight. When travelling as a foursome, especially with a toddler in tow, it’s easiest to travel as lightly as possible.     

Eco By Naty Nappies Review

Yes, there’s no getting around the fact that reusable nappies are better for the environment than disposable nappies. However, disposables are very much a part of our life.  As such, I do prefer to pick ones that have a lighter environmental footprint.  One such disposable nappy brand that I have been used on both of my daughters over the years is Eco by Naty.  

naty by nature nappies

Eco by Naty nappies are latex, chlorine, and fragrance-free disposable nappies. This makes for a more comfortable nappy, particularly if your little one has very sensitive skin.  The conventional plastic outer sheet of a disposable nappy has been replaced with a GM-free maize starch and cellulose fibre. This gives a breathable yet waterproof outer layer, and the nappies are filled with up to 65% natural materials.  

The nappies are the first nappies to gain OK Biobased Certification. This is an independent certification that certifies products made from renewable raw materials, for extra peace of mind.

All of these fancy words all sound very well, but you’re probably wondering how they perform?  Well, over the last six years, I’m pleased to report we have had no problems with leaks. We’ve also had no real problems with nappy rash or skin irritation, which is the ultimate test, really!  The only times we have had problems with nappy rash is during teething. However, I think that’s a given, no matter what nappy you use.

Naty Don’t Just Sell Nappies

Whilst I am a seasoned Eco by Naty nappy user, I was surprised to learn recently that Naty also has a range of personal care products for the whole family.  From baby bath and skin care to family bath and skin care, each and every product is certified organic by Ecocert.  This certification means that there is a minimum of 95% of plant-based ingredients in the formula. What’s more, a minimum of 10% of all ingredients (by weight) come from organic farming.

eco by naty baby shampoo

Each product is free of parabens, phthalates, paraffin, gluten, mineral oils, synthetic colours, synthetic fragrances, animal ingredients, and other such ingredients.  Not only that, all of the ingredients are ethically sourced, and cruelty-free.

As a family, we switched to using shampoo bars at the start of this year.  While it’s working out great for my partner and me, what we’ve found is that my girls haven’t taken too well to the shampoo bars.  After a month or so, we kept noticing both of them scratching their heads pretty vigorously. My initial thoughts were “ahh, poop, head lice”, but after going through their hair quite literally with a fine-tooth comb, repeatedly and thankfully finding nothing, I realised that the shampoo bars must be irritating their scalp.  I have switched to Naty shampoo, which not only cleans beautifully, but I’ve found that their itching has stopped.  

eco by naty pantyliners

Naty Caters to Adults Too

Naty also sells a range of organic feminine care which are made to the same standards as all their other products.  From tampons made from 100% organic cotton – to sanitary pads and panty liners that have a cloth-like feel. There are all much more breathable and comfortable than their plastic-based counterparts.  

Getting back to nappies, the next step for us will be potty training, and I will be passing on my reusable nappies to another parent.  As well as passing on the nappies, I’ll be passing along the advice that you do not have to use them 100% of the time to make a positive environmental impact.  Even using just one reusable nappy a day will save you from using 365 disposable nappies – which is a simply staggering amount!