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Zero Waste Crisps Recipe

my zero waste kitchen dk books jane turner
zero waste crisps recipe

Looking for plastic-free and zero-waste crisps?  I’ve got you covered – read on!

Dorling Kindersley has recently released My Zero Waste Kitchen*, a really useful zero-waste cookbook and guide by Kate Turner.  Full of smart and simple ideas to shop, plan, cook, and eat waste-free, as well as with ten recipes to use up leftovers and food scraps, it’s a handy guide to have at your fingertips.

Make Plastic-Free Crisps

Dorling Kindersley has kindly let me share this great recipe from the book for zero waste crisps with Moral Fibres readers.

Kate’s recipe lets you transform potato peelings or old veg into these moreish crisps, creating a healthy zero waste snack from leftover veg!  Each recipe in the book contains three zero-waste twists to give suggestions on how to customise the recipe depending on what you have to hand and to encourage you to get creative with the contents of your fridge.  This recipe is no exception – you’ll find three plastic-free and zero-waste twists at the end.

SERVES 2

Ingredients

You will need:

  • 50g potato peel from around 2 large potatoes
  • 50 g kale
  • ½ tbsp olive oil
  • A generous pinch of chilli powder
  • ½ tsp sweet smoked paprika powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

First Make The Zero Waste Crisps Base

To make the zero-waste crisps base, preheat the oven to 150ºC (300ºF/Gas 2) and line 2–3 baking trays with baking parchment.

Place the potato peel in a mixing bowl with half of the oil, spices, salt, and pepper.  Using your hands (wear gloves if necessary), gently rub the peel until it is completely coated with oil and spices.  Set aside.

Using a sharp knife, remove the tough, woody kale stems and roughly chop the leaves into bite-sized pieces.

Place the kale in a mixing bowl with the remaining oil, spices, salt, and pepper.  Gently rub the kale for 1–2 minutes until it is completely coated and starting to soften.

Spread the potato peel and kale thinly on separate baking trays in single, even layers.  Set the kale tray aside.

Place the potato peel in the oven and leave to roast for 25 minutes.  After 10 minutes, add the kale tray and continue roasting for the remaining 15 minutes, or until crisp. Watch carefully to ensure they don’t burn.

Remove the crisps from the oven and leave them on the trays for a few minutes to crisp up before eating.

The crisps are best eaten within a few hours but can be stored in an airtight container for 1–2 days.  Re-crisp them in the oven at a low temperature for 3–4 minutes.

Now Zero-Waste Your Crisps!

There are loads of different options to zero-waste the basic crisps recipe. Try some of these out, or create your own option based on what leftovers you have:

Sweet Potato and Potato Peel Crisps

Swap the kale for the peel of 2 large sweet potatoes – about 50g.  Combine with the regular potato peel and season as per the recipe.  Roast both for 25 minutes, or until crisp

Tired Parsnip and Potato Peel Crisps

wap the kale for 1 parsnip – about 100g.  Slice very thinly, either with a mandolin or a vegetable peeler, including tops and tails.  Season, spread thinly on a baking tray, and roast for around 35 minutes, or until crisp.  Thicker slices may need an extra 5 minutes but watch carefully to ensure they don’t burn.  Add the potato peel tray to the oven for the last 25 minutes.

Tired Beetroot and Potato Peel Crisps

Swap the kale for 1 beetroot – about 100g.  Slice very thinly either with a mandolin or a vegetable peeler, including tops and tails.  Season, spread thinly on a baking tray, and roast for around 35 minutes, or until crisp.  Thicker slices may need an extra 5 minutes, but watch carefully to ensure they don’t burn.  Add the potato peel tray to the oven for the last 25 minutes.

Or simply combine all the vegetables to create a rainbow of flavours and colours in your zero-waste crisps.

And in case you missed it, don’t forget to check out my guide to plastic-free snack ideas

Food & Drink

Where to Buy Cheap Organic Wine

aldi organic wine

Want to know where to buy cheap organic wine?  Let me share my secrets.

I am not particularly fussy about wine.  If I’m buying wine for myself, either in a shop or bar/restaurant, I will generally always pick either a Chilean red – maybe a Malbec or Merlot – or a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc.  However if a friend shows up at my door brandishing a bottle of wine, then I will happily sit and quaff whatever it is.  Red, white or rose, and whatever type whilst we chew the fat.

We popped into Aldi over the weekend to pick up some alcohol for Christmas.  In the absence of an independent bottle shop in our area, we go to Aldi.  They sell lots of beers from smaller independent brewers, such as the relatively local to us Williams Bros, who make some pretty nice beer.  I’ve also found Aldi’s wine is pretty good too.  And I’m not going to lie, the price is pretty good too.

Where to Buy Cheap Organic Wine

Whilst picking up some beers and perusing the wine in Aldi I spotted some intriguing-looking beer bottles.  Or rather, I thought they were beer bottles.  On second look I realised they were actually wines.  And not just wines, but organic wines.  Organic wines at a rather bargainous £2.99 a bottle.  I picked up a bottle of red and a bottle of white, just to see how nice such cheap organic wine could be.

Now the bottles come packaged in beer bottles, crown caps, and all.  And as you can imagine are smaller than a standard wine bottle.  You get 500 ml compared to the standard 750 ml wine bottle size.  However, it does mean that a litre of wine comes in at £5.98, which is pretty good value. Particularly for organic wine.  They are by South African winery – Origin Wines.

But Are They Any Good?

We’ve tried both of Aldi’s cheap organic wines, in the interests of quality control of course.  The red – a South African red – is by far my favourite.  It’s very fruity, very smooth, and not too acidic.  What’s more, it doesn’t leave a bad taste in your mouth, as some cheap reds do.  We drank it on its own of an evening after the kids went to bed, and it went down very very well.  I think it would work well paired with food too though.  We are already planning a return trip to Aldi to buy a few more bottles for over the festive season!

The white isn’t entirely my cup of tea.  It’s perfectly drinkable but felt a little dry for my liking.  Maybe it’s more of a Chardonnay in style.  We managed to drink it all though, so it wasn’t that bad!  You might really like it, so don’t discount it on my advice.

Aldi’s organic wine is cringingly marketed as a “craft wine” in an attempt to tap into the success of the craft beer movement and to entice millennials into buying more wine.  Now, I’m too old to be a millennial and don’t need fancy packaging to get me to buy wine.  I’m also not too sure what craft wine actually means, especially considering Origin Wine says they are one of the top 3 South African wine exporters.  However, if you can get past the gimmicky packaging and the “craft wine” label it’s actually pretty nice organic wine for £2.99, particularly the red.  I’ll raise a glass to it!

Have you tried Aldi’s organic wine?  What did you think of it?  And do check out my ethical wine guide, and my tips on what to do with leftover wine, in case you haven’t been able to finish your wine.