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Food & Drink

Food & Drink

Ad | Three Easy Plastic-Free Kitchen Swaps

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I’m working with Friends of Glass today to promote the benefits of glass. Friends of Glass is a community that supports everything about glass packaging and advocates a lifestyle that includes glass for three main reasons: health, taste, and sustainability.

When you first start off reducing your plastic usage, using glass in place of plastic can be daunting. So, I wanted to show you three ways in which I have switched from using plastic to using glass in my kitchen.

Storing Food In Glass In The Fridge

storing food in glass jars

Preventing food waste isn’t always easy. With the best of intentions sometimes you find something festering away in a tub at the back of the fridge.

I always feel that what lets Tupperware tubs down is that depending on the style of the tub or how tomato-stained your tub is, you can’t always see inside. And out of sight, out of mind – which is not a good thing when it comes to food waste.

Something I have had good success with is storing my food in glass jars. I can easily see the contents of the jars meaning I’m more than likely to use up my food. For added bonus points – glass doesn’t get tomato stained!

Storing Food In Glass In The Freezer

Did you know that you can store food in the freezer in glass jars? Oh yes! You made have heard horror stories about freezing glass, but I have found that if you stick to the four golden rules when it comes to freezing food in glass jars then you can eliminate breakages:

● Do not overfill your jar – always leave around two inches of headspace in your jar. As the contents freeze, they will expand a little, and this method offers room for expansion, helping to avoid breakage. Jars with a wide mouth, rather than bottles, make for a safer choice for freezing.
● Make sure your food is fully cooled before placing it in the freezer.
● When you first put your food in the freezer, sit the lid on your jar loosely.
Once your food is completely frozen, you can then tighten up the lid. If you forget to tighten up the lid (I often do!), then don’t worry, it won’t affect your food.
● Finally, watch how you stack your jars to prevent jars from falling out of the freezer. This won’t be much of a problem if your freezer has drawers.

I don’t buy specific jars for freezing food in – I re-use what I already have. Jars that I have found particularly useful are old peanut butter jars and vegan mayonnaise jars.

Food Storage On The Go

best way to transport soup to work

I could wax lyrical about the joys of soup all day long – it’s such a great way to use up any leftover vegetables looking a bit sad in the drawer of your fridge.

Whilst making soup is easy, transporting soup for an easy homemade lunch at work can be tricky. I’ve had many a Tupperware container or a flask leak my precious soupy cargo over the years.

Through trial and error, I can safely say that what I have had the most success with is transporting my soup in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid (not a clip top style jar). Just make sure that the lid is tightly screwed before popping it in your bag, and try not to drop your bag! If you are accident-prone, wrapping a tea towel around your jar can help act as a buffer, and also help you mop up any soupy spills after lunch!

For an added eco bonus, if your work doesn’t have any composting facilities, you can bring any of your food scraps home in your empty jar at the end of the day.

What makes glass a good replacement for plastic Tupperware?

There are six main reasons as to why glass is a good eco-friendly replacement to Tupperware (remember – only once your Tupperware has come to the end of its lifespan):

  1. Unlike plastic, glass has an endless life. It is 100% recyclable and can be recycled infinitely without loss of quality – it can take just 30 days for your bottle or jar to return as a new bottle or jar to the store shelf.
  2. Unlike other packaging materials, glass packaging is a healthy choice because it needs no chemical layer to protect what it contains, so there is no danger of toxic chemicals, such as BPA, leaching into food and drinks.
  3. Glass preserves the taste of food and drinks perfectly.
  4. Food and drink preserved in glass can help keep food and drink fresher for longer.
  5. Glass is made from three naturally occurring, abundant materials – soda ash, limestone, and sand.
  6. Modern glass bottles and jars are typically up to 40% lighter yet stronger thanks to new manufacturing processes.

Don’t Throw Out Your Old Tupperware Though!

Before you get carried away and start binning your old Tupperware, stop and take a breath. I am a huge proponent of using up what you have – I believe it’s simply not sustainable to throw out plastic items you already have in order to replace them with reusables made from more eco-friendly materials. So I am still using my old plastic Tupperware containers, which will be in active service until they are no longer usable.

When your tubs give up the ghost, I recommend only then replacing them with glass. I have bought two glass tubs, but in the main, I have been using old glass jars as the most sustainable and eco-friendly way to store food.

Are you a fan of glass too? Are you looking to make some of your own plastic-free kitchen swaps? Why not join the Friends of Glass community The Friends of Glass community believes that many families and retailers are unaware of these benefits of glass, and so want to spread the word. You can help by joining the ever-growing number of glass advocates on Instagram, Facebook and/or Twitter, to help add your voice!

Food & Drink, Kitchen Staples

AD | Plastic-Free Instant Coffee – Finally!

plastic-free instant coffee uk

Paid-for content in association with Little’s.

I’ve never understood why up until now it’s been so difficult to find plastic-free instant coffee. Most instant coffee is sold in jars with plastic lids – why not switch the plastic lid to a metal lid and the job’s done?

Thankfully, one instant coffee brand has taken the initiative and switched to plastic-free packaging: Little’s Coffee.

Little’s Coffee is a small independent family business, selling 100% Arabica coffee, and they are proud to now be 100% plastic-free. Spearheaded by husband and wife duo Henry and Leila Little 25 years ago, the business is now run by their son, Will Little, and his wife, Caroline. By taking the lead on removing plastic from their jars of instant coffee, this small company is definitely leagues ahead of the big boys of coffee.

Their delicious range of instant coffee is all packaged in glass jars with 100% aluminum lids, both of which materials, unlike plastic, can be infinitely recycled, which is much better for the environment.

Rather than popping mine in the appropriate recycling bins once I’ve finished my coffee, I’m planning on recycling my Little’s jars in different ways. Call me a geek, but I do like a good jar, and Little’s jars look so very good. I have plans to use them either in my kitchen for food storage, or for health & beauty DIYs, before recycling them appropriately at the end of their lives.

Of course, it’s not just all about the packaging. The plastic-free packaging is all well and good but the coffee has to taste good too. Thankfully, Little’s delivers above and beyond on this point. The 100% Arabica coffee is gently brewed with no nasties to deliver a smooth and tasty single blend plastic-free instant coffee that’s available in both caffeinated and decaffeinated options.

Their decaf coffee is made still using the best quality 100% Arabica coffee and decaffeinated using a gentle CO2 process. This process retains all the coffee’s great natural taste, without the use of chemicals that are used in solvent-based decaffeination processes.

Flavoured Instant Coffee

plastic-free instant coffee

As well as standard coffee, Little’s star of the show is their flavour infused instant coffees, which has evolved to suit peoples busy lifestyles. Available in a wide range of flavours – from Cardamom Bun, to Gingerbread Cookie, to Irish Cream flavoured coffee – I counted 13 different flavours of plastic-free coffee to choose from, all modestly priced between £2.99 and £3.20 a jar.

To be honest, I’ve never been a big fan of flavoured coffees, finding the taste of coffee syrups too sweet, and the process of measuring out sticky syrups being a bit of a faff. I was surprised to find that Little’s range of pre-flavoured coffee (again, available in caffeinated and decaffeinated) has no added sugar. This means their coffee hits the spot without the intense sugary sweetness that coffee syrups often have, and can be whipped up in the same time it takes to make a cup of regular coffee.

I bought some Chocolate Caramel coffee and some Island Coconut coffee and both make great pick-me-ups to combat the 2 pm post-lunch slump. At only 4 calories a cup, the coffee is better for you than raiding the biscuit tin for that chocolate hit! Needless to say, I’ve got jar of Little’s at work now to help keep me out of the biscuit tin.

Without being overly sweet, the Chocolate Caramel coffee smells and to me tastes just like tiramisu – my partner hates all coffee but even he conceded that the coffee smelled delicious. A world first, let me tell you! The Island Coconut coffee is not too dissimilar to a Bounty bar, which is a very good thing in my book. It’s a great way to liven up your coffee!

Where to Buy Little’s Plastic-Free Coffee

Little’s Coffee is available across the UK and is stocked in Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Ocado, Holland & Barrett, Dobbies Garden Centres, Booths, Whole Foods Market, Selfridges & Co, and Harvey Nichols.

Little’s also has an online shop if you can’t find a jar near you. I ordered my coffee from their online shop and was delighted to find that it shipped in a cardboard box sealed with paper tape – no plastic to be found – not even a shred of bubble wrap.

If you’re shopping online too, Little’s Coffee has kindly set up a discount code for Moral Fibres readers: use the discount code MORALFIBRES10 at the checkout of the Little’s Coffee webshop for 10% off your order.

Visit the Little’s online shop here for delicious coffee in recyclable packaging, and pay them a visit on Instagram for colourful coffee-related content!