Category

Arts & Crafts

Arts & Crafts, Health & Beauty, Life & Style

Reusable Cotton Wool Pads Free Crochet Pattern

reusable cotton wool pads

cotton wool pads

I’m really excited to share with you a fantastic reusable cotton wool pads tutorial created for Moral Fibres readers by Lyndsey, curator of What You Sow.   Here Lyndsey shares how to green your daily beauty routine with these simple and eco-friendly washable cotton wool pads:

I’m constantly on the lookout for ways of reducing my carbon footprint, one of the main aims being to reduce the amount of things I buy and throw away.

One daily annoyance is throwing away the cotton pads that I use to remove my makeup. Not only do they come in a non-recyclable plastic packet but many have been factory made then air freighted half way around the world as well.

I decided to make some reusable cotton pads that I could just put in the wash when they’ve been used.  Read on to find out how I did it!

Reusable Cotton Wool Pads DIY

reusable cotton wool pad

To make your reusable cotton wool pads You will need a UK size 4 crochet hook (if you’re outside of the UK then please note UK crochet hook sizes are different to international sizes – UK size 4 corresponds with a 6.00mm hook or a 10/J hook) and some cotton yarn of your choice. My favourites are Sirdar Simply Recycled and Rowan Purelife which both come in some lovely colours. You need about 8m of yarn.

crochet cotton pad

Ch4, then join with a sl st to the first stitch.

Row 1: Ch 1, *puff st (yo, insert hook into stitch, pull strand through, do the same 4 more times then pull your yarn through all 11 loops on the hook, close the puff with a chain), ch 1*, repeat * 7 more times then join with a sl st to the top of the first puff stitch and move with a sl st into the gap between the first & second puff. 8 puff st.

reusable make up remover pad diy

Row 2: Ch 1, 2 puff st into first gap, then 2 puff st into each gap all the way round. Note that you don’t chain between the stitches like you did on the first row. Once you have 16 puff st, join with a sl st to the first puff stitch. 16 puff st.

eco friendly cotton wool pad

Sew in the ends and there you have your finished cotton pad. Make a bundle of them and store them in your bathroom ready to use at bed time!

Enjoy.

eco friendly makeup remover pad

Thanks so much Lynsey!  If you are looking for other ways to green your beauty routine do check out my health and beauty category for more inspiration!

Arts & Crafts, Children, Families, Life & Style

Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Continuing with the Easter holidays theme, here is a great eco-friendly easter egg alternative you can make, or get your kids to make on a wet (or snowy, as it is at the moment!) afternoon:

I’m not too big on giving my daughter too much chocolate, she gets a little bit, but we do try to limit what she eats, so Easter with it’s influx of chocolate does pose a little bit of a problem.  It’s not just the chocolate: Easter also poses an eco-friendly issue.   Easter eggs are one of the most overly packaged items on the shop shelf.  A typical egg will be housed in an elaborate box, a large plastic mould and wrapped in foil.  The egg itself will typically contain a plastic bag full of yet more sweets.

Trying to come up with a healthy eco-friendly Easter egg alternative called for some creative thinking and head scratching.  After a bit of brainstorming I found a set of four wooden two-part eggs for a few pounds (available here).  Then armed with a bundle of scrap fabric and a lot of glue I decoupaged the eggs to create some eggs that can be filled with any item of your choosing –  such as crayons or healthy treats.  The best part is that these can be refilled, and will last for many Easters to come, making these a fantastic eco-friendly Easter egg alternative!

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

It’s really easy to decoupage, and a great fun activity for kids.  You will need:

easter egg diy

Instructions:

  • Cut some scrap fabric into 1cm squared squares.
  • Mixed 1 part PVA glue with 1 part water in a bowl.  Give the glue and water a good mix with your finger, or an old paintbrush.
  • Separate your wooden eggs into two parts and sit them on a protected surface.
  • Dunk your fabric squares into the PVA glue/water mix, giving them a good soaking.  Squeeze out any excess water/glue then apply to your egg.  Smooth out any creases with your finger as you go.
  • Make sure you cover up all bits of wood with your fabric.
  • Leave to dry overnight.
  • Glue a ribbon or trim in place if desired.

I tried a patchwork effect on my first egg but wasn’t so keen with how it came out, so I stuck to one fabric per egg.

You could also paint the eggs using acrylic paints, or draw on them using sharpies or gel pens, however my painting skills are not up to scratch, which is why I went for decoupage.  If you’re a dab hand with a paintbrush or pen, or your kids would rather paint than decoupage,  then here are some stylish examples of painted eggs that I found at Blank Goods:

easy easter crafts

easter craft ideas

You could also use washi tape, like these ones from Bliss Bloom:

easter egg decorating ideas

If you’re handy with a crotchet hook, you could even make these lovely eggs, spotted at Red Heart:

crochet eggs diy

These would be great for a kids egg hunt!

There you have it, lots of lovely eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives to traditional chocolate Easter eggs that have the added bonus of being a bit healthier too!