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Life & Style

Fashion, Life & Style

Ethical Clothing Inspiration

summer ethical clothing

Looking for some summer ethical clothing inspiration?  I’ve put together a list of lovely ethical pieces that have caught my eye lately with summer sun, lazy days, and exploring in mind.  Call it my fantasy fairtrade shopping list if you will!

ethical fashion inspiration

From clockwise:

People Tree top* (£45) – a simple classic for summer days.

Lotta From Stockholm clogs (£56.50) – a stylish sandal upgrade.

People Tree Top* (£60) If I only buy one thing this summer, it will be this top.  It’s made for picnics in the park.  Also, pockets.

Green People Organic Sunscreen* (£22.00) – Sunscreen without the nasties.

Crossed Sunglasses (£95.00) – Expensive sunglasses give me the fear that I’ll drop them, sit on them or leave them sitting on a park bench.  One day I’ll reach Grownup Level 10, where I’ll be incredibly responsible with sunglasses, and consider a pair of these beauties.

Veja Trainers (€75) – for off road adventuring.  And vegan friendly.

ethical clothing lookbook

Komodo Checked ‘Wendy’ Dress (£48) – this checked dress has my name all over it, quite literally.

Monkee Genes Jeans (£40) – for a smart alternative to denim.

Here Today, Here Tomorrow Tote Bag (£105) -for carrying sun screen, glasses, a good book and other summer in the park essentials.

Beaumont Organic Cotton Dress (£109) – be still my beating heart.

Thought Organic Cotton Trousers* (£59.90) – cotton trousers for days when you don’t want to get your legs out, or when it’s too cold for dresses.  Because let’s be realistic for just one second: summer in the UK isn’t all sunshine and blue skies!

 

What are your plans for the summer?  We plan on sorting out our garden, tending to the allotment, spending sunny days in the park, taking day trips to Fife and East Lothian, and taking a wee holiday on the west coast.  Roll on the nice weather!

Good Reads, Life & Style

How To Learn Something New From The Comfort of Your Own Home

how to learn something new

When I want to learn something new one of the first things I’ll do is check online to see if I can take a class.  Taking classes are fun, and a great way to meet like-minded people, but what I’ve found from trying to find or take classes is that:

a) the class you would most interested in taking isn’t running in your area

b)  a six week class sounds quite intense when you just want to learn at your own pace from the comfort of your own home

c)  sometimes or you just don’t feel like talking to a bunch of strangers towards the end of the day AND learn a new skill.

d) the cost of classes can be a bit of a barrier to taking part

If you can relate to any of these points then never fear!  I’ve been researching some of the best ways on how to learn something new at home:

4 Resources to Learn Something New At Home

Do Books

do books

Have you heard of Do Books?   I’ve only just come across them and have to say I’m a little bit smitten.  Produced by The Do Book Co, Do Books are a series of inspirational pocket guides on a variety of topics.  From advice on how to live more sustainably (such as Do Grow and Do Beekeeping), to advice for startups and entrepreneurs (such as the intriguingly titled Do Fly and Do Disrupt) Do have something for everyone to just get up and do something that catches your eye.

If you’re itching to learn something new – whether that’s the mastery of a new skill or craft – or need a simple mindshift, or a shot of inspiration,  the Do Books want to give you the tools and inspiration to try new things out in the most accessible manner possible.  Each book is fairly short, about 100 pages, as it focuses on the ‘doing’ rather than bogging you down in the background theory.  Of course, the background theory is useful to know, but sometimes that side of things can be a bit overwhelming when you just want to try something out to see if it’s for you.

Skillshare

how to do something new

If you learn by watching and doing rather than reading, then Skillshare is the place for you.  At Skillshare you can take online classes, where experts teach via video on a wide variety of topics and learn at your own pace.   There are over 15,000 classes to choose from.  I’ve tried learning to knit in the past, rather unsuccessfully, so this one looks good.

What I like best about Skillshare is that each class has a project for you to complete, which you then post on the Skillshare site.  This lets participants exchange feedback and learn together, making it feel like a class rather than just you sitting at home learning a new skill in isolation.  You can browse past projects here – it’s really interesting.

Craftsy

If you are looking to learn craft based skills then Craftsy is one to check out.  From sewing, drawing, photography, jewellery making, paper crafts and more, Craftsy covers all the main crafts with hundreds upon hundreds of high quality video classes.  Each class has a dedicated message board for asking questions and sharing projects, and tutors do check in on these boards and reply, giving it a nice community feel.

Creativebug

Similar to Craftsy, Creativebug offers high quality video lessons on craft based endeavours.  What makes it different is that they also run great quality classes specifically for kids, such as this class on finger knitting.  This is a great way to introduce kids to different crafts, and maybe crafts classes that aren’t necessarily running in your area.

Do you have any favourite learning resources?  Pop them in the comments below!