eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Here is a great eco-friendly easter egg alternative you can make, or get your kids to make on a wet afternoon.

I’m not too big on giving my daughter too much chocolate.  She gets a little bit, but we do try to limit how much she eats.  The influx of chocolate at Easter, therefore, makes me feel a little uncomfortable.  

However, It’s not just the chocolate.  Easter eggs are one of the most overly packaged items on the shop shelf.  A typical egg will be housed in an elaborate box, a large plastic case, and be wrapped in foil.  The egg itself will typically contain a plastic bag full of yet more sweets.

Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives?

Trying to come up with a healthy eco-friendly Easter egg alternative called for some creative thinking and head-scratching.  After a bit of brainstorming, I found a set of four wooden two-part eggs for a few pounds on eBay.  They don’t seem to be available anymore, but I have found some cardboard ones*.

 Then armed with a bundle of scrap fabric and a lot of glue I decoupaged the eggs to create some eggs that can be filled with any item of your choosing –  such as crayons or healthy treats.  The best part is that these can be refilled, and will last for many Easters to come, making these a fantastic eco-friendly Easter egg alternative!

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

How to Decoupage Eggs

It’s really easy to decoupage and a great fun activity for kids.  

This post contains affiliate links denoted by *, which contributes to the running costs of the site.  

You will need

easter egg diy

PVA Glue

Water

Scrap Fabrics

Ribbon/Trim

Decoupage Eggs*

Instructions

  • Cut some scrap fabric into 1cm squared squares.
  • Mixed 1 part PVA glue with 1 part water in a bowl.  Then give the glue and water a good mix with your finger, or an old paintbrush.
  • Separate your wooden eggs into two parts and sit them on a protected surface.
  • Dunk your fabric squares into the PVA glue/water mix, giving them a good soaking.  Squeeze out any excess water/glue then apply to your egg.  Smooth out any creases with your finger as you go.
  • Make sure you cover up all bits of wood/cardboard with your fabric.
  • Leave to dry overnight.
  • Glue a ribbon or trim in place if desired.

I tried a patchwork effect on my first egg.  However I wasn’t so keen with how it came out, so I stuck to one fabric per egg.

You could also paint the eggs using acrylic paints, or draw on them using sharpies or gel pens.  However my painting skills are not up to scratch, which is why I went for decoupage!  If you’re a dab hand with a paintbrush or pen, or your kids would rather paint than decoupage,  then here are some stylish examples of painted eggs that I found:easy easter crafts

easter craft ideas

You could also use washi tape, like these ones from Bliss Bloom:

easter egg decorating ideas

If you’re handy with a crochet hook, you could even make these lovely eggs, spotted at Red Heart:

crochet eggs diy

These would be great for a kids egg hunt!

There you have it, lots of lovely eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives to traditional chocolate Easter eggs that have the added bonus of being a bit healthier too!

If you’re also looking for Easter lunch ideas, then do check out my vegan Easter lunch ideas post for some inspiration.

Found this post useful?  You can buy me a coffee to help support the site’s running costs.  Alternatively, please support the site by sharing this post with your friends, following along on Instagram, or signing up for the free Moral Fibres monthly newsletter.