Home, Home and Garden

How to Get Rid of Fruit Flies Naturally

how to get rid of fruit flies from your kitchen naturally

Let’s chat about how to get rid of fruit flies. You might call them compost flies. Whatever you call them, I wanted to share the effective natural method I’ve found for clearing your kitchen of this almighty pest.

I know, I know, you’re thinking exciting stuff, but it’s a very real problem I face every summer without fail. And chances are, by the fact that you’re reading this post, one that you face too.

Every summer I feel like I blink and my kitchen goes from fruit fly free, to hosting a swarm of hundreds. Hundreds of fruit flies that are multiplying in front of my very eyes.

What Are Fruit Flies And Why Are They A Problem?

Fruit flies are scientifically known as Drosophila melanogaster, but we’ll keep to the simple fruit fly term here!

I’ve found out from the Berg Lab that female fruit flies can lay up to around 400 eggs. These eggs hatch within 12 to 15 hours and these can go from egg to adult in just seven days. What is more, females become receptive to courting males about 8–12 hours after emerging from the egg.

Basically, blink and you’ve got a fruit fly problem before you even know it!

how to get rid of fruit flies from your kitchen naturally

How to Get Rid of Fruit Flies From Your Kitchen

Be Mindful of Where You Store Your Fruit

If you have a fruit fly infestation then an open fruit bowl isn’t always the best place to store fruit. Consider using the fridge for fruit that will store well in the fridge (beware, not all fruit likes the fridge). Fruit flies like higher temperatures, and can’t reproduce in the cold.

Do not leave cut or spoiling fruit or vegetables, fruit salads, fruit juices, jams, jellies, pickles, etc., exposed in open containers. Pop them in tubs or glass jars, and put them straight into the fridge.

Remove Rotting Fruit and Vegetables As Quickly As Possible

Rotting fruit and vegetables are ideal breeding groups for fruit flies. Be mindful of what is in your fruit bowl, and check there isn’t any spoiled fruit in the bottom of your fruit bowl.

Check vegetables such as potatoes and onions, which should be stored in cupboards, and not in the fridge. There could be one rotten potato or onion at the bottom of the bag, which would be enough to support a huge colony of fruit flies.

Keep Sides Clean

Wiping up food spills from countertops quickly, especially sugary foods like jams and ketchups and fruit juices, are vital in the fight against fruit flies.

Keep Your Compost Caddy Covered & Empty Frequently

Keeping the lid on your compost caddy is vital when you have a fruit fly infestation. Try placing something heavy on top of it, to limit any access to the fruit flies.

I recommend emptying your compost caddy regularly when you are bothered by fruit flies. I try to empty my caddy at least twice a day. Washing it out regularly is also key in the fight against the fruit fly.

How To Make a Fruit Fly Trap

If the above steps aren’t making a dent in the amount of fruit flies in your kitchen, then consider this it’s time to pull out the natural traps. I find these key in how to get rid of fruit flies.

What You Need

  • An empty bottle
  • A small amount of beer, wine, or vinegar (enough to cover an inch or so of the bottom of the beer bottle)
  • One squirt of washing up liquid

Simply add some beer, wine, or vinegar into an empty bottle. One with a narrow neck works best – like a beer bottle, add the washing up liquid, and bobs your uncle.

The alcohol or vinegar tempts the flies in with its stale sweetness, and the washing up liquid soap decreases the surface tension of the liquid. When the fruit flies fly in to investigate the irresistible stale smell, the flies are immediately immersed and can’t escape.

ps: Like this post? Try this one on how to make natural weedkiller.

Fashion, Life & Style

Ethical Socks and Tights Guide

ethical socks tights uk

On the lookout for ethical socks and ethical tights?  I’ve got you covered with this handy guide.

Socks and tights are as much of an autumn and winter staple as cups of tea, blankets, and nice woolly jumpers.  I’m never without a pair of socks.  So, as a wardrobe essential, I’ve been hunting down ethical socks for men and women to feature here.  I’ve also thrown in some ethical tights for good measure too.

Listed below are a few of my favourite brands in 2020, and I’m always on the lookout for more to feature here:

ethical socks uk
Ethical socks from Thought

Guide to Ethical Socks & Tights

To help support the running costs of the blog any links marked with a * after them are affiliate links, which means I may get a very tiny percentage of the sale price if you buy anything using the links below.  This doesn’t affect the price you pay for items or your consumer rights, such as your right to return items.

Ethical Socks Guide

Bam: Bamboo

Bam: Bamboo* sells soft socks from sustainably sourced bamboo.  Packs of four cost around £18, and if you buy any 3 selected mix and match garments from Bam Bamboo – these don’t have to be socks – you will receive 20% off.

Heist

Heist*, who has a strong commitment to sustainability, sell lightweight pop socks that despite their thinness, are designed to last, with reinforced toes and heels.  Their stay-up ankle band means no digging or your socks rolling down, which is great because this is always a problem with this type of sock.  Each pair is £7.

Jollies

Jollies sell colourful organic cotton socks that are made in England.  What’s more, for every pair sold, one pair of Jollies socks is donated to local homeless shelters.  So far thousands of pairs of socks have been donated to over 50 shelters nation-wide.  Prices start from £9.

Leiho

Leiho’s* sustainably sourced & vegan-friendly bamboo socks are not only fun but charitable too.  For every pair of socks sold, a pair is donated to homeless shelters.  Prices are around £12 per pair.

Organic Basics

Organic Basics* sell soft and durable socks ethically and sustainably made in Turkey and Portugal from organic cotton. Prices start at £12 for a pack of two, and take 10% off your order with discount code WENDYOBC at the checkout.

People Tree

Ethical stalwarts People Tree* sell super soft organic cotton socks in a wide range of colours, prints, and designs.  Their ethical socks start from £7 per pair.

Ethical Tights Guide

ethical socks and tights uk
Ethical Tights from Heist

The market for ethical tights is small, but I have found some gems for you:

Heist

Heist’s* specialty is their Italian made tights.  From their range of nude tights in seven representative shades; to their thicker 80 denier tights; to fishnets made from sustainable pre-consumer recycled waste – all of their tights come in inclusive sizes from a UK size 4 to a UK size 22.   

Swedish Stockings

Swedish Stockings* sustainable hosiery range is made from pre- and post-consumer nylon waste that is non-biodegradable. They recycle this waste nylon to create their range of tights, socks, and leggings, reducing water consumption and energy. They also run a great tights recycling scheme, where you can recycle your old tights.

Another option in autumn and winter, if you’re wearing boots, is to wear leggings with socks.  Ok, it’s not so attractive when you take off your boots, but I like wearing leggings as they are nice and cosy and don’t snag or run like tights do, making them much more durable.  I don’t mind spending a bit more on something that I know is going to last and are as versatile as leggings.  My favourite ethical leggings come from People Tree* and Organic Basics*.

PS: while you are here, you might find this post on ethical underwear useful too!