Arts & Crafts, Life & Style

How To Remove Candle Wax From A Jar Easily

Never dispose of a candle jar again. Let me show you how to remove candle wax from its jar using four different techniques, so that you can recycle and reuse the jars over and over again.

So, you bought and burned your favourite candle and now you are left with a jar or candle holder that would be just the thing to reuse as another candle holder, trinket holder, or a plant pot? However, you’ve been left with a waxy, sooty mess that seems impossible to remove? Yup, I’ve been there too. Thankfully, it is easier and not as messy as you think to remove the residual candle wax from your jar. Let me show you four different methods that you can try at home today.

How To Remove Candle Wax From Its Jar – Four Ways

Image of three candles in glass jars with a blue text box that says how to remove candle wax from jars so you can reuse them.

First, of all – a note on safety. When you are trying to remove candle wax, it can be tempting to burn your candle as much as it will allow before self-extinguishing. This isn’t a great idea. The base of the jar can get very hot and cause your candle to explode. Burning it this far down can also damage the surface your candle is sitting on.

Instead, extinguish your candle when about one centimetre to half a centimetre (½ of an inch to ¼ of an inch if you prefer old school measurements) of wax remains. This will prevent your candle jar from overheating, and potentially shattering.

Now we’ve got the safety chat out of the way, here are the best ways I’ve found to remove leftover candle wax from its jar. You can use the quick links below to navigate to each section, or just keep scrolling:

Freeze The Candle

Use Hot Water

The Soaking Method

Warm The Candle In The Oven

Freeze The Candle

My preferred method to remove candle wax from a jar is to simply pop the whole thing in the freezer overnight. Yup, just put the candle jar upright in the freezer. This method shrinks the wax – no matter if the wax is plant-based or mineral-based – making it easy to remove. In the morning, you can just take the candle jar out of the freezer and turn it upside down. The leftover candle wax should just pop right out, without too much fuss.

If the candle wax is being stubborn, then you can use a spoon or a butter knife to carefully prise the wax out. If it won’t come out, then don’t risk injuring yourself. Just try another method.

Use Hot Water To Remove Candle Wax

If you can, use a spoon or butter knife to remove as much excess wax as possible. Place your candle jar on a heatproof surface, and then, depending on what your candle is made of, add hot water.

  • If your candle was made from beeswax or soy wax, then add hot water to the jar – leaving around 2 centimetres of space at the top of the jar.
  • If you candle was made from a mineral based wax, then add boiling water to the jar, again leaving around 2 centimetres of space at the top of the jar. This method can cause your jar to break so do if you decide to try this technique then proceed with caution. Take care when using boiling water as your candle jar may not be heatproof. If you hear any supicious cracking noises, then, using an oven glove, carefully pour out the water. If in any doubt about the integrity of your jar, or if it is made of thin glass, then do not use this method for candles made from mineral based wax.

No matter which method you try, after a short period, the hot water should have melted the candle wax. This should cause the majority of the wax to float to the surface of the container. Let the water cool completely before removing any large pieces of wax, and then strain the water into a bowl – not your sink. Using a mesh strainer, try to fish out as many small pieces of wax out of the water as possible, before discarding the water. This is because wax could block your sink.

The Soaking Method

For beeswax or soy-based candles, then another effective method for removing candle wax from your jar is the soaking method. If you are not precious about keeping the label on your candle jar – because it will come off – then using this method you just let the candle jar soak in hot water.

Simply fill your sink with hot water, and place the jar in the water for around half an hour or so. The heat should melt the residual candle wax, making it easy to scoop out with a spoon or butter knife.

Warm The Candle Jar In The Oven To Remove Wax

This method isn’t my favourite, as it’s a little messier than the others. However, if your candle wax is refusing to budge from its jar, then it’s a good technique to have up your sleeve.

Do note that this method is not suitable for candle jars with any decorations on them. This includes stickers, labels, sequins, or glitter. Only place plain glass jars in the oven.

If your jar is suitable, preheat your oven to 80°C/180°F, and line a rimmed baking dish with some tin foil. Place the candle upside down on the dish and then pop it in the oven, for about 15 minutes or until the wax melts. You’ll know when the wax melts because the wax will form a pool on the tin foil.

Once the wax has melted, remove the dish from the oven, and place it on a trivet or similar heat-safe surface. Then let your jar cool before cleaning it in warm soapy water. When the leftover wax has dried on the tin foil, simply peel it off the tin foil to reuse or recycle. Do see my notes on candle wax recycling below for more details on this.

Final Steps

No matter which method you employ to remove candle wax from your jar, your jar will need a good clean. A scrub in warm soapy water will help remove any residual wax and soot, leaving your jar ready for whatever purpose you have in mind.

How To Recycle Candle Wax

Once you have successfully been able to remove the leftover candle wax from your jar, don’t bin it. It’s a little-known fact that old candle wax can actually be recycled, even if you are not a candlemaker.

If you make your own candles, simply keep the wax scraps to meltdown for future candle-making crafting times. However, even if you don’t make your own candles, you can still recycle the old candle wax.

Companies like The Recycled Candle Company will take any type of old candle wax and melt it down to make new candles. The wax can be in any colour, scent, or size. And don’t worry if there is any debris in the wax. This can be removed during the refining process. And after following all of these tips, and you still can’t remove the wax from your candle jar, they will also take the wax in all types of containers. This includes glass. They will even take the aluminium sustainers from tealights, and these will be recycled too for zero waste.

If you are local to Devon, you can drop off your candle wax in person. Alternatively, you can save up your leftover candle wax, and post it to them. All the information you need is here.

Babies, Families

Best Sustainable Baby Clothes To Know Now

Are you looking for the best sustainable baby clothes? Try these eco-conscious and ethical brands that focus on GOTS-certified organic cotton, organic bamboo, and other eco-friendly materials.

Buying baby clothes can be tricky – especially if you want to balance what’s best for you and your baby and what’s best for the planet. Particularly in the babywear market, many retailers are making sustainability claims. But are they really green?

There is greenwashing abound. BCI Cotton labeling, for example, is one used by major retailers to claim they are sustainable. But what I found is that BCI Cotton isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

To help you navigate the murky waters of greenwashing, I’ve picked out the best sustainable baby brands. I’ve focused on retailers for whom sustainability is very much part of their business ethos. From organic materials to ethical production, to considerations on durability. I’ve even found sustainable baby clothes brands embracing circularity, through repair and reuse schees.

What Are the Most Sustainable Baby Clothes?

As with anything, the most sustainable baby clothes are ones that you have been able to source secondhand. Some of my favourite places to source baby clothes secondhand include Gumtree, Facebook, and charity shops.

I’m also a fan of using eBay for secondhand baby clothes. I’ve had some real successes over the years on eBay – particularly when it comes to buying bundles of baby clothing. Pop something like “3 6 months bundle” into the search bar, to find people selling aged 3 -6 month baby clothes in bundles. It can be an incredibly affordable way of shopping sustainably. Check out some of my other secondhand clothes shops online if you are looking for more ideas.

The Best Sustainable Baby Clothes

An image of a yellow baby suit on a cream background with a blue text box that says the best sustainable baby clothes to know now.

Sometimes, however, you can’t always find what you are looking for secondhand. Or you might want to buy a special gift for a new baby. Therefore, I’ve rounded up some of my favourite places to shop for sustainable baby clothes, from brands that prioritise both people and the planet.

In order to help support the running costs of Moral Fibres, this post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. Moral Fibres may earn a small commission, at no extra cost to readers, on items that have been purchased through those links. This income helps keep this site running.

Boody Baby

Boody's sustainable organic bamboo baby clothes

If you are looking for sustainable and organic basics for your baby then Boody Baby* is a great place to look. Every item in their Eco Baby collection is made from organic bamboo, that’s spun into supersoft fibres. From sleeveless bodysuits, to baby vests, bibs, and t-shirts you’ll find a host of eco-friendly basics in white, pink, or blue.

All of Boody’s items are produced adhering to the highest standards for both the planet and its workers. For peace of mind, Boody Baby carries Oeko-Tex’s “Confidence in Textiles” label. This is an independent certification that shows that all of Boody’s sustainable baby clothes are free from both pesticides and harmful chemicals. 

Boody Baby* is priced from £5 upwards. Sign up to the Boody mailing list, and get 15% off your first order.

The Bright Company

Baby wearing an ethical sleepsuit from The Bright Company

Fitting babies between 0 to 18 months, The Bright Company* creates gorgeous organic sleepsuits for babies. Ethically made in Portugal, from super-soft organic cotton jersey, and built to last, these are really special pieces. Slim-fitting, The Bright Company says that avoiding the baggy excessive fabric so common in sleepsuit designs today makes the first tentative crawls, steps, and runs much easier.

In terms of sizing, The Bright Company babywear fits true to size. However, they suggest that if your child is in-between sizes then you should go up a size. Simply roll up the sleeves and ankles so you get maximum wear out of the item.

Buy The Bright Company sleepsuits* for £26.

Frugi Sustainable Baby Clothes

Organic baby romper suit from Frugi

Frugi* makes wonderfully colourful and fun sustainable baby clothes and sleeping sacks. Their collection is made from GOTS certified organic cotton. This means that their clothing is independently certified to guarantee that the harvesting of the raw cotton, right the way through to the manufacturing and labelling has all been carried out in an environmentally and socially responsible manner.

What I love is that a lot of thought has gone into the making of Frugi’s baby clothes. The clever two-way zip design on their suits means that you do not need to remove the whole suit when changing their nappy. What’s more, some of their clothing features clever extendable cuffs that unfold. This allows the all-in-one to grow with your baby, and means you can get a longer lifespan out of their baby clothes.

Meanwhile, many of their baby clothes have been designed to fit over fluffy cloth nappies. Many baby clothes manufacturers design with disposable nappies in mind, so it’s always great to find baby clothes that are designed to accommodate reusable nappies.

The average price of an item at Frugi* is around £25.

Little Green Radicals

Little Green Radicals snow suit

Little Green Radicals* make sustainable and Fairtrade baby clothes that are made from 100% GOTS certified organic cotton. What’s more the bags Little Green Radicals use to protect their clothes are 100% compostable, made from non-genetically modified corn starch.

Find basics, such as baby grows, bodysuits and pyjamas, stylish outfits, and baby outwear. Romper suits cost around £22.

Organic Zoo

Two twin babies wearing sustainable baby clothes from Organic Zoo.

Organic Zoo* makes timeless 100% organic clothing for babies. What’s more, their organic raw cotton comes from certified fair trade suppliers. This means that the cotton farmers get a fairer price for their crop. All of their baby clothes are then designed in Brighton, and then ethically made in Europe. Keen to reduce wastage, here any leftover fabric is cleverly used for mattress filling.

All of Organic Zoo’s sustainable baby clothes are soft and gentle on your baby’s skin. What’s more, all of their clothing is unisex and well-made so that it’s outgrown, not worn out, so that clothes to be handed on and enjoyed by other little ones. 

Prices start from £32* for separates.

Polarn O. Pyret

Babies wearing Polarn O Pyrets sustainable baby clothes

As well as selling pre-term clothes for premature babies (the only ethical retailer I’ve found offering this), Polarn O. Pyret* has the largest collection of eco-friendly baby clothes going. From GOTS certified organic cotton to organic wool and other sustainable materials, you’ll find every item of sustainable baby clothes you could ever need here.

Every garment is made to last at least 3 children, if not many more. What’s more, many of their styles are designed to grow with your little one. From roll-down cuffs to adjustable waists and extendable bodysuits, everything has been carefully considered.

Polarn O. Pyret has many great sustainability measures in place too.  They offer a free repairs service to fix zips and replace broken poppers on all of their outerwear garments. This is regardless of when they were purchased.

They have also recently introduced a buy-back scheme. Here, when your child grows out of their Polarn O. Pyret clothes, they will help you find a new owner for it. In return, you’ll receive a voucher to use on new items online. At the moment, this only applies to outerwear, such as jackets and rain trousers. Hopefully, this may expand in the future to all of their clothes. I’ll keep you updated here.

Prices at Polarn O. Pyret* start from £12 for organic baby leggings, through to £22 for sleepsuits.

Toby Tiger

A baby wearing one of Toby Tiger's bright ethical babygrows.

Toby Tiger* makes fun sustainable baby clothes in a riot of colour and pattern. These are all ethically made from GOTS certified organic cotton.

Their bold and bright clothes feature clever components to make for fuss-free changing. This includes envelope necklines and leg poppers. What’s more, you’ll find extra room to fit cloth nappies comfortably.

From sleepsuits to pyjamas, separates, bibs, and outwear, they have almost all of your ethical baby needs covered.

Organic cotton bodysuits start from £8.99, to £40 for cosy fleece hoodies.

If you are looking for clothes for older kids, do try my guide to ethical kid’s clothing. Here I cover everything, from tots to teens.