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Babies, Families

Best Sustainable Baby Clothes To Know Now

Are you looking for the best sustainable baby clothes? Try these eco-conscious and ethical brands that focus on GOTS-certified organic cotton, organic bamboo, and other eco-friendly materials.

Buying baby clothes can be tricky – especially if you want to balance what’s best for you and your baby and what’s best for the planet. Particularly in the babywear market, many retailers are making sustainability claims. But are they really green?

There is greenwashing abound. BCI Cotton labeling, for example, is one used by major retailers to claim they are sustainable. But what I found is that BCI Cotton isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

To help you navigate the murky waters of greenwashing, I’ve picked out the best sustainable baby brands. I’ve focused on retailers for whom sustainability is very much part of their business ethos. From organic materials to ethical production, to considerations on durability. I’ve even found sustainable baby clothes brands embracing circularity, through repair and reuse schees.

What Are the Most Sustainable Baby Clothes?

As with anything, the most sustainable baby clothes are ones that you have been able to source secondhand. Some of my favourite places to source baby clothes secondhand include Gumtree, Facebook, and charity shops.

I’m also a fan of using eBay for secondhand baby clothes. I’ve had some real successes over the years on eBay – particularly when it comes to buying bundles of baby clothing. Pop something like “3 6 months bundle” into the search bar, to find people selling aged 3 -6 month baby clothes in bundles. It can be an incredibly affordable way of shopping sustainably. Check out some of my other secondhand clothes shops online if you are looking for more ideas.

The Best Sustainable Baby Clothes

An image of a yellow baby suit on a cream background with a blue text box that says the best sustainable baby clothes to know now.

Sometimes, however, you can’t always find what you are looking for secondhand. Or you might want to buy a special gift for a new baby. Therefore, I’ve rounded up some of my favourite places to shop for sustainable baby clothes, from brands that prioritise both people and the planet.

In order to help support the running costs of Moral Fibres, this post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. Moral Fibres may earn a small commission, at no extra cost to readers, on items that have been purchased through those links. This income helps keep this site running.

Boody Baby

Boody's sustainable organic bamboo baby clothes

If you are looking for sustainable and organic basics for your baby then Boody Baby* is a great place to look. Every item in their Eco Baby collection is made from organic bamboo, that’s spun into supersoft fibres. From sleeveless bodysuits, to baby vests, bibs, and t-shirts you’ll find a host of eco-friendly basics in white, pink, or blue.

All of Boody’s items are produced adhering to the highest standards for both the planet and its workers. For peace of mind, Boody Baby carries Oeko-Tex’s “Confidence in Textiles” label. This is an independent certification that shows that all of Boody’s sustainable baby clothes are free from both pesticides and harmful chemicals. 

Boody Baby* is priced from £5 upwards. Sign up to the Boody mailing list, and get 15% off your first order.

The Bright Company

Baby wearing an ethical sleepsuit from The Bright Company

Fitting babies between 0 to 18 months, The Bright Company* creates gorgeous organic sleepsuits for babies. Ethically made in Portugal, from super-soft organic cotton jersey, and built to last, these are really special pieces. Slim-fitting, The Bright Company says that avoiding the baggy excessive fabric so common in sleepsuit designs today makes the first tentative crawls, steps, and runs much easier.

In terms of sizing, The Bright Company babywear fits true to size. However, they suggest that if your child is in-between sizes then you should go up a size. Simply roll up the sleeves and ankles so you get maximum wear out of the item.

Buy The Bright Company sleepsuits* for £26.

Frugi Sustainable Baby Clothes

Organic baby romper suit from Frugi

Frugi* makes wonderfully colourful and fun sustainable baby clothes and sleeping sacks. Their collection is made from GOTS certified organic cotton. This means that their clothing is independently certified to guarantee that the harvesting of the raw cotton, right the way through to the manufacturing and labelling has all been carried out in an environmentally and socially responsible manner.

What I love is that a lot of thought has gone into the making of Frugi’s baby clothes. The clever two-way zip design on their suits means that you do not need to remove the whole suit when changing their nappy. What’s more, some of their clothing features clever extendable cuffs that unfold. This allows the all-in-one to grow with your baby, and means you can get a longer lifespan out of their baby clothes.

Meanwhile, many of their baby clothes have been designed to fit over fluffy cloth nappies. Many baby clothes manufacturers design with disposable nappies in mind, so it’s always great to find baby clothes that are designed to accommodate reusable nappies.

The average price of an item at Frugi* is around £25.

Little Green Radicals

Little Green Radicals snow suit

Little Green Radicals* make sustainable and Fairtrade baby clothes that are made from 100% GOTS certified organic cotton. What’s more the bags Little Green Radicals use to protect their clothes are 100% compostable, made from non-genetically modified corn starch.

Find basics, such as baby grows, bodysuits and pyjamas, stylish outfits, and baby outwear. Romper suits cost around £22.

Organic Zoo

Two twin babies wearing sustainable baby clothes from Organic Zoo.

Organic Zoo* makes timeless 100% organic clothing for babies. What’s more, their organic raw cotton comes from certified fair trade suppliers. This means that the cotton farmers get a fairer price for their crop. All of their baby clothes are then designed in Brighton, and then ethically made in Europe. Keen to reduce wastage, here any leftover fabric is cleverly used for mattress filling.

All of Organic Zoo’s sustainable baby clothes are soft and gentle on your baby’s skin. What’s more, all of their clothing is unisex and well-made so that it’s outgrown, not worn out, so that clothes to be handed on and enjoyed by other little ones. 

Prices start from £32* for separates.

Polarn O. Pyret

Babies wearing Polarn O Pyrets sustainable baby clothes

As well as selling pre-term clothes for premature babies (the only ethical retailer I’ve found offering this), Polarn O. Pyret* has the largest collection of eco-friendly baby clothes going. From GOTS certified organic cotton to organic wool and other sustainable materials, you’ll find every item of sustainable baby clothes you could ever need here.

Every garment is made to last at least 3 children, if not many more. What’s more, many of their styles are designed to grow with your little one. From roll-down cuffs to adjustable waists and extendable bodysuits, everything has been carefully considered.

Polarn O. Pyret has many great sustainability measures in place too.  They offer a free repairs service to fix zips and replace broken poppers on all of their outerwear garments. This is regardless of when they were purchased.

They have also recently introduced a buy-back scheme. Here, when your child grows out of their Polarn O. Pyret clothes, they will help you find a new owner for it. In return, you’ll receive a voucher to use on new items online. At the moment, this only applies to outerwear, such as jackets and rain trousers. Hopefully, this may expand in the future to all of their clothes. I’ll keep you updated here.

Prices at Polarn O. Pyret* start from £12 for organic baby leggings, through to £22 for sleepsuits.

Toby Tiger

A baby wearing one of Toby Tiger's bright ethical babygrows.

Toby Tiger* makes fun sustainable baby clothes in a riot of colour and pattern. These are all ethically made from GOTS certified organic cotton.

Their bold and bright clothes feature clever components to make for fuss-free changing. This includes envelope necklines and leg poppers. What’s more, you’ll find extra room to fit cloth nappies comfortably.

From sleepsuits to pyjamas, separates, bibs, and outwear, they have almost all of your ethical baby needs covered.

Organic cotton bodysuits start from £8.99, to £40 for cosy fleece hoodies.

If you are looking for clothes for older kids, do try my guide to ethical kid’s clothing. Here I cover everything, from tots to teens.

Babies, Families

Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies That Actually Work

eco friendly disposable nappies

Looking for eco-friendly disposable nappies? Here are the best eco-friendly nappies we’ve found that actually work, without leaks.

I’m a huge fan of reusable nappies. When my first daughter was born, I went into using reusable nappies thinking it was all or nothing. I was going to use reusable nappies 100% of the time, and that was that. Perhaps for some parents that approach works and is entirely practical for their life. However, at some point along the line, we discovered that for us we would need to use eco-friendly disposable nappies some of the time.

So as well as extolling the virtues of reusable nappies, I’m really keen to let new parents know not to be disheartened if they have to use disposable nappies some of the time or even all of the time. For us, using a disposable nappy at night time was the difference between sleep and no sleep. And of course, washable nappies do not work for everyone’s lifestyle. For others, the upfront cost of reusables may be prohibitive.

As such, I thought I’d do a round-up of the best eco-friendly disposable nappies available in the UK.

A baby wearing a disposable nappy

First off, here are the quick links for disposable nappy brands, in case you just want to visit the site of a particular brand. Scroll down past this section if you want more information about what makes a nappy eco-friendly, and information on each eco-friendly nappy brand listed.

In order to help support the running costs of Moral Fibres, this post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. Moral Fibres may earn a small commission, at no extra cost to readers, on items that have been purchased through those links. In the interests of disclosure, some brands have also paid to be featured in this article. This is denoted by **.

Can disposable nappies be eco-friendly?

Before I start, I do have some things to point out about eco-friendly disposable nappies.  My main gripe is that they all say they are biodegradable.  However, due to the way landfill works, nothing truly biodegrades in landfill.

Oxygen is required for biodegradable matter to break down.  However, most landfill sites are so tightly packed that they do not let much or any air in.  Therefore, any biodegradation that does take place does so very slowly, or it is mummified.

Biodegradable items in landfills also release a considerable amount of the greenhouse gas methane.  All I will say is be skeptical of green claims of biodegradability.

Can you compost biodegradable nappies?

You might be tempted to compost nappies labelled as biodegradable.  However, biodegradable is not the same as compostable.

Even if you were tempted to try out composting, I wouldn’t.  According to RecycleNow you cannot compost biodegradable nappies in a compost bin as it poses a health risk.

Some nappy manufacturers say you can compost a biodegradable nappy at home.  This is as long as you don’t compost soiled nappies.  As someone who composts, this sounds like a total nightmare. 

If you are using disposables full-time, or even using them part-time, then you’d need a pretty massive composter.  This would be purely to hold that many nappies over a sustained period, as well as the mixed waste that composters require to work effectively.  Nappies would take a long time to decompose in a standard composter, so you might end up with an overflowing compost bin before long.  In short, I wouldn’t.

So what’s the point of paying more for eco-friendly nappies?

I’m not completely down on disposable nappies.

There are many plus points associated with eco-friendly disposable nappies.  The first is that they are typically made with far fewer harsh chemicals compared to other nappies.  The absorbent core of disposable nappies is typically filled with harsh chemicals.  However, the eco-friendlier brands have found less chemical-intensive ways to create absorbency without leaks.  This is good for the environment and for your baby’s skin.

The eco-friendlier brands also tend to be made from more renewable resources.  As standard nappies are mostly made of virgin plastic, this reduction in the use of fossil fuels is great for the planet.  

And, finally, eco-friendly nappies tend to be made more ethically.  Take Pampers, who are made by Proctor & Gamble.  Proctor & Gamble has been linked to human rights abuses in its supply chains. And what’s more, Proctor & Gamble has also been linked to the habitat destruction of threatened species.  

Guide to Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

Image of a baby wearing only a nappy, with a blue text box that says guide to the best eco-friendly disposable nappies

You can avoid supporting these practices by switching to eco-friendly brands, where possible.  Try my guide to the best nappies that benefit both baby and the planet.

Ecoriginals

Australian-based Ecoriginals** have recently started selling their disposable nappies in the UK. This is exciting because this is the first brand I’ve come across that packages their nappies in home compostable packaging. Why it has taken the nappy industry so long to catch up on this, I don’t know, but I’m so glad someone finally has taken this leap.

Catering for sizes from newborn right through to junior nappy pants, these ultra-absorbent nappies will see you right through the baby years.

Ecoriginals say that their nappies are made from 90% plant-based ingredients. This includes materials such as wood pulp, cotton, and corn starch, as well as plant-based glue. Currently, only two of the outer components remain that are not entirely made from plants. The sticky tabs and leg elastic are not. However, both can be cut out and discarded separately after use if needed.

For added impact, Ecoriginals also plants one tree per order. They also fund plastic recycling and solar power schemes in India, to help with the transition to clean power.

If you would like to try Ecoriginals out, you can buy a trial pack of 30 nappies, plus 3 packets of their plant-based baby wipes for just £9.95. Signing up for this also automatically gives you a handy 20% subscription discount for life.

Bambo Nature

Danish made Bambo Nature* nappies top the Ethical Consumer’s league table of disposable nappies.  It’s also the only eco-friendly disposable nappy to be independently accredited by the Nordic Swan eco-label.  

What I like is that Bambo Nature has an absorbent starch core, rather than a chemical-based core associated with standard nappies. The brand also avoids perfumes and other harsh chemicals – including chlorine – in their nappies, which is reassuring. I tried this brand on my kids, and we had no leaks, so it’s a big thumbs up from us!

Beaming Baby

Beaming Baby* claims their chlorine-free nappies contain 30% fewer chemicals than standard disposable nappies.  Meanwhile, the absorbent layer inside the nappy does contain gel.  Instead, it is primarily made from very finely shredded paper. Whilst you might think that shredded paper doesn’t sound very effective or absorbent, again, I tried this brand out on my kids, and again I’m happy to report zero leaks!

Moltex Oko

Moltex Oko* says their nappies are made with more than 50% renewable resources.  They’re chlorine-free.  What’s more, they contain no perfumes, as well as minimal amounts of absorbent gels.  I also found the price comparable to standard nappy brands, which is always appreciated!

Naty by Nature

Naty by Nature Nappies* are made in Sweden from 70% natural materials.  These include a combination of natural tree pulp and maize derivatives.  As such, they are 100% chlorine, latex, and plastic-free.

We personally used Naty nappies for both of our kids as our main choice of nappy. This was mainly because they were the easiest eco-friendly disposable nappies to find at the time – being sold in both Boots and in supermarkets.  If we ran out, we could pick some up at the shop, rather than having to order more in. They also did a stellar job of keeping the contents of the nappy in the nappy. No leaks here!

gNappies

gNappies* are a reusable/disposable hybrid.  This means they feature washable covers with disposable inserts.  As such, they could be an alternative if you didn’t want to go down the all washable or all disposable route.

gNappies say that non-soiled inserts can be placed in a home composter.  Here they say the insert can break down in around 50 to 150 days.  However, it may not be the green solution it seems.

Granted, the inserts are much smaller than conventional nappies.  However, if you’re getting through around 5-7 inserts a day (around 40 a week), then you’re going to run into a problem.  Unless you have a massive compost bin, then your composter may fill fast.  I would say it will fill faster with nappies than you can make compost.  150 days is a long time when you’re filling the composter every day with more nappies.

I am skeptical. However, if you can’t switch to full on reusables, but are looking to slim your bin, then it could be a good option to help reduce the volume of nappy waste going in your bin.

What is the best option?

My opinion?  I know washable nappies aren’t for everyone.  If you don’t use washable nappies and can’t afford the extra spend of buying eco-friendly disposable nappies then I wouldn’t worry about using standard nappies.  Budgets don’t often stretch to more expensive nappies.  

As parents, there are a million other things to feel guilty about, without worrying about which nappies you use.  There are plenty of other more beneficial and low-cost ways to help the environment

I would say that if you use washable nappies and are just looking for a nappy just for night-time use then I would try one of the brands listed here.  The same goes if you can afford to use eco nappies full time. Otherwise, focus on what you can do.

I originally wrote this post back in 2013.  I’ve updated it for 2022.  However, my kids have grown and the nappy days are far behind us.  Therefore I need your help! If there is a brand you love that isn’t listed here do let me know. I want to keep the post updated so that it can remain a useful resource for parents.

ps: I have a handy guide to ethical kid’s clothes right this way.  I also have loads of ethical baby and child tips which I’ve added over the years.  From eco-friendly potty training tips to my eco-friendly baby essentials and the best eco-friendly baby wipes.  Do check them out!