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ethical shopping guide

Fashion, Life & Style

Ethical Slippers for Cosy Toes

Looking for a pair of eco-friendly or ethical slippers? Good news then, I’ve rounded up my favourites for you!

With all this staying at home, ethical slippers are on my mind.

This winter it feels like staying comfortable and cosy has never been as important as it has now. I was updating my guide to ethical pyjamas and loungewear and my guide to ethical socks and thought why stop here. I, therefore, carried out some research and found some of the best eco-friendly and ethical slippers for both women and men available in the UK right now.

What I’ve found is that much like the ethical clothing market, the ethical slippers market is small. To make things harder, this already small market has been hit by Brexit. Many ethical slipper choices are made in the EU and shipped to the UK. However, because of Brexit, many EU-based retailers have stopped shipping to the UK.

For those EU-based retailers that are still shipping to the UK, import duties must now be paid on purchases from the EU coming into the UK. This means that when you order from the EU you are hit with these hidden charges. As such, for this guide, I’ve focused on what’s accessible within the UK. It therefore might be small, but I’ve managed to cover all bases I hope!

Slipper Ethics

I’m mindful that everyone has different ethics when it comes to clothing and footwear. As such, this guide has been designed to be a starting-off point for you to research the most sustainable option for you.

Some of the slippers I’ve recommended are vegan-friendly. For these, I’ve sourced those made using recycled plastic bottles, rather than virgin plastic. And for those looking for plastic-free slippers, I’ve sourced ethical slippers made considerately using wool, suede, and/or sheepskin. Where sheepskin has been used, I’ve focused on those upcycling byproducts from other industries.

Guide to Ethical Slippers

This post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. This doesn’t affect the price you pay for items or your consumer rights, such as your right to return items.  It just means that I get a very tiny percentage of the sale price if you buy anything via the link.  This helps cover blog costs, such as my web hosting.

Egos Copenhagen

fairtrade slippers uk

Egos wool slippers (£39 – available in the UK from Wild Swans) are ethically made by hand in Nepal by skilled craftswomen. In fact, Egos have been certified by The World Fair Trade Organization.

Each pair takes time and skill to make. As such, each employee can only make 2 pairs of shoes a day. It’s definitely a case of quality over quantity.

The raw wool is dyed with environmentally friendly colors, before being molded into the slipper shape. Another inner layer of felt is then added, for extra comfort. Finally, the outer suede sole is stitched on these incredibly cosy slippers.

Gumbies

Gumbies sustainable slippers

Each pair of Gumbies unisex vegan slippers (£35) are made from recycled plastic derived from post-consumer plastic bottles. In fact, 8 bottles are used to make each pair. What’s more, the soles are even made from recycled rubber.

Rather than stop there, the insoles are made from beans. Yes, beans, you read that correctly! The soft foam Gumbies use for their insoles are made from 100% Castor Bean, a naturally derived material.

Mercredy

ethical slippers uk

Mercredy’s eco-friendly slippers* (£34.95) are handcrafted in Spain using recycled plastic bottles. They use plastic bottles collected from the ocean to create the heavy-duty felt fabric for the slippers. In fact each slipper is made from at least 2 recycled bottles.

This fabric, which is used in both the upper and lining for the slippers is certified 100% recycled by the Global Recycling Standard. What’s more, the sole is made from natural rubber, which is sustainably sourced.

My verdict? Mercredy make for a great pair vegan slippers.

Onaie

Onaie’s beautiful felt slippers* (£31.49) are made and finished in the Polish Highlands using age-old techniques. Onaie says “we take the ethical manufacture of footwear very seriously. We know our craftswomen, we know their business practices and we work side by side with our suppliers to ensure ongoing ethical, social and environmental compliance.” 

These beautiful slippers would make such a lovely ethical gift idea for someone special, or as a treat to yourself.

The Small Home

guide to eco-friendly and sustainable slippers

The Small Home sells beautiful handmade embroidered slippers. Each unique pair is made from the softest shearling sheepskin, using off-cuts from Rolls Royce car interiors to ensure the highest grade skins and to minimise waste.

The Small Home say “The natural materials we use to make our sheepskin slippers are designed to last and offer a sustainable and ethical alternative to fast fashion. Our hand-stitched sheepskin slippers are an everyday luxury suited to slow, mindful living.”

What Else Can I Do?

The single most eco-friendly choice of slippers are the ones you already have. If your existing pair have started to wear out, why not look at how you can repair them?

Learning some basic techniques to repair holes and tears is a great first step. Another useful tool for fixing slippers, depending on what they are made of, is Sugru. I’m obsessed with it!

Beyond your own ethical choices you can also help to engender change on the High St. One way you can do this is to ask High St brands who make their clothes (see Fashion Revolution for their great resources).  This will help press for transparency and sustainability on the High Street. 

Even if you can’t afford to shop for ethical slippers, you can also support the brands that align with your values.  Even if you can’t afford to purchase ethical alternatives, you can also like, comment on, and share their social media posts to help boost their exposure.

Fashion, Life & Style

Sustainable Socks and Tights Guide

ethical socks tights uk

On the lookout for sustainable socks and ethical tights?  Good news: I’ve got you covered with this handy guide.

I write lots of sustainable shopping guides. From ethical underwear, to ethical pyjamas, right the way through to UK-based ethical clothing brands. And today I wanted to turn my attention to socks and tights. Specifically sustainable socks and tights.

Socks and tights are as much of an autumn and winter staple as cups of tea, blankets, and nice woolly jumpers.  I’m never without a pair of socks.  So, as a wardrobe essential, I’ve hunted down ethical socks for men and women to feature here.  I’ve also thrown in sustainable tights for good measure too.

Listed below are a few of my favourite brands for 2021. And I’m always on the lookout for more to feature here:

ethical socks uk
Ethical socks from Thought

Guide to Sustainble Socks

To help support the running costs of the blog any links marked with a * after them are affiliate links. This means I may get a very tiny percentage of the sale price if you buy anything using the links below.  This doesn’t affect the price you pay for items or your consumer rights, such as your right to return items.

Bam: Bamboo

Bam: Bamboo* sells soft socks from sustainably sourced bamboo.  Packs of four cost around £18. What’s more, if you buy any 3 selected mix and match garments from Bam Bamboo – these don’t have to be socks – you will receive 20% off.

Boody

Are you overwhelmed by choice and just want plain black socks? Try Boody*. Here you’ll find ethically made plain black socks in every style under the sun. From everyday socks, to sports ankle socks, to even ballet pump liner socks – they’re plain, and they’re only available in black. Prices start from £4.95, and take 10% off your first order when you sign up to their mailing list.

Heist

Heist*, who has a strong commitment to sustainability, sells lightweight pop socks that despite their thinness, are designed to last. Think reinforced toes and heels.  Their stay-up ankle band also means no digging or your socks rolling down, which is great because this is always a problem with this type of sock.  Each pair is £7.

Jollies

Jollies sell colourful organic cotton socks that are made in England.  What’s more, for every pair sold, one pair of Jollies socks is donated to local homeless shelters.  So far thousands of pairs of socks have been donated to over 50 shelters nation-wide.  Prices start from £9.

Leiho

Leiho’s* sustainably sourced & vegan-friendly bamboo socks are not only fun but charitable too.  For every pair of socks sold, a pair is donated to homeless shelters.  The prices are around £12 per pair.

Organic Basics

Danish-based Organic Basics* sell soft and durable socks ethically and sustainably made in Turkey and Portugal from organic cotton. Prices start at £12 for a pack of two. What’s more, take 10% off your order with discount code WENDYOBC at the checkout.

People Tree

Ethical stalwarts People Tree* sell super soft organic cotton socks in a wide range of colours, prints, and designs.  Their ethical socks start from £7 per pair.

Thought

Thought* have a great selection of men’s and women’s ethical socks, like the beautiful ones pictured above.  All their socks are ethically made from organic cotton, and super soft bamboo or hemp. You’ll also find a wide selection of funky prints and patterns. There’s definitely a pair of socks to suit everyone.  The prices are around £6.95 for a pair.

Ethical Tights Guide

ethical socks and tights uk
Ethical Tights from Heist

The market for sustainable tights is small, but I have found some gems for you:

Heist

Heist’s* specialty is their Italian-made tights.  I love a lot of things about Heist. Where to start?! From their range of nude tights in seven representative shades. To their thicker 80 denier tights. To fishnets made from sustainable pre-consumer recycled waste. What’s more, all of their tights come in more inclusive sizes, catering for a UK size 4 up to a UK size 22.   

Swedish Stockings

Swedish Stockings* sustainable hosiery range is made from pre- and post-consumer nylon waste that is non-biodegradable. They recycle this waste nylon to create their range of tights, socks, and leggings. All of this reduces water consumption and energy., making them a great sustainable choice. They also run a great tights recycling scheme, where you can recycle your old tights.

Another option in autumn and winter, if you’re wearing boots, is to wear leggings with socks.  Ok, it’s not so attractive when you take off your boots, but I like wearing leggings as they are nice and cosy and don’t snag or run like tights do, making them much more durable.  I don’t mind spending a bit more on something that I know is going to last and are as versatile as leggings.  If you’re after leggings too then my favourite ethical leggings come from People Tree* and Organic Basics*.

Found any more sustainable socks and tights brands? Do let me know!