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gardening

Garden, Home and Garden

How to Compost In A Flat

Joy from Sustainable Jungle, a sustainable living blog, and podcast, is here today to share her how to compost in a flat knowledge with Moral Fibres readers. Joy has been composting in her flat for six months and is keen to share her multi-pronged attack so other flat dwellers can learn from her composting experience:


how to compost in an apartment

Our introduction to the concept of composting started in London in 2017. We had just been on an epic honeymoon through Africa. The time we spent in some of the most impressive and raw places on earth, like Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda and the Serengeti in Tanzania, delivered the harsh realisation that we, personally, were doing nothing truly positive for the environment and the ecosystems we care so much about.

So we started investigating living more sustainably, using the fantastic online resources available and made some important changes, one of which was composting. We thought we were rather smart because we discovered that “composting” in a flat in the London Borough of Camden is pretty simple – you collect your food scraps (including citrus and bones) in a caddy and leave it out on the street once a week for the council to collect it. Nice n Easy…

Then… we moved home to Australia. And we discovered very quickly that Australia is generally quite behind on making the most of food waste. We’d become so used to our empty, stink-free waste bins and found ourselves starting our composting journey from scratch. We also moved into a flat… which as it turns out, makes composting a little harder.

Six months on and there have been many iterations. We’ve certainly got a long way to go but we’re pretty happy with how far we’ve come. So much so that we are keen to share our current setup and experience with any flat dwellers looking to divert that valuable food waste from landfill, and perhaps even use some nutrient-rich compost on their own mini apartment garden.

How To Compost In A Flat

Aside from meal planning and better use of the full fruit or vegetable to reduce the amount of food scraps we need to get rid of in the first place, we are currently running the following setup:

Vermicomposting on the Balcony

composting in a flat
Joy’s vermicomposter

We didn’t want to overcommit to a worm farm until we were confident we wouldn’t kill our worm babies, so instead, we invested in a kid’s ‘learn to worm’ type vermicomposter*. I’m pleased to report that we have managed to keep our worms alive, even through a brutal Australian summer!

We love our worms, they make this amazing worm tea (stink free worm wee) which we use on our plants, both indoor and outdoor. This, along with the worm castings, really seem to make a huge difference to our plants’ health. This vermicomposter takes on about 10-20% of our weekly waste (given its quite small) and while worms can eat almost anything, there are some scraps they don’t eat so we had to find other solutions to deal with our remaining food scraps.

worm tea
Joy’s plants thrive on her worm tea

Bokashi Bins on the Balcony

how to compost in a flat
Joy’s bokashi bins

We had grand plans for our bokashi bins*. We were going to keep them inside to make life just that bit more convenient. They’re not supposed to smell and they’re supposed to convert things like bones, onions and orange peels (which worms don’t like) into something that worms can eat, or that can be easily composted in a traditional composter.

They indeed do a good job of converting hard-to-compost items, and they take on another 10-20% of our waste, but boy, do the ones we purchased stink! Our advice after this experience is to absolutely invest in good quality bokashi bins that have a really, really strong seal. Needless to say, our bokashi bins have been banished to the balcony and we’re looking for a suitable indoor version. Worth noting if you want to try this at home: you need at least 2 bokashi bins (for 2 people) as you need to alternate them – one bokashi does its fermenting job while the other one gets filled with scraps.

Local Community Garden, via ShareWaste App

food waste ideas

Probably the most impactful discovery for us was the ShareWaste App, which helped us find a community garden close by and in need of food scraps for their big composters. Our process is to collect our daily scraps in a bowl as we chop and cook. We then transfer to a big plastic bucket once a day and then take this bucket (with our remaining 70-80% of food scraps) to the community garden once a week.

It sounds like a big schlep but it really isn’t. It’s become part of our habit and the garden is near our local dog park where we take our little pooch anyway. We were thrilled to find that our family members have also used the ShareWaste app to find people in their local community who are now gratefully accepting their food scraps too. My mum takes her foods scraps across the road to her neighbour, and now has a new friend too!

So there you have it! I’d say we are intermediate apartment composters now. We still have some work to do both to reduce our waste but also to process our own. This is what we plan to tackle next:

  • Indoor Bokashi: We’re on a mission to find the best indoor, stink-free option
  • Make vegetable stock: This is a bit of a no-brainer, we just need to build the habit.
  • Dog poop composting: We now have a puppy and he is a poop machine. We have a somewhat zero waste approach now but it could be better.
  • Traditional composter: We’re really getting into balcony gardening so we plan to experiment with a traditional composter so we can keep some of that compost goodness for our own garden.

Composting in a flat sure is an art and unless you have heaps of space, it’s likely you need a multi-pronged approach, especially if you don’t have a balcony. I hope that sharing our experience has helped the aspiring flat composters out there, and if you have found a great way of dealing with food waste, please do share your tips on how to compost in a flat – both with us and those around you!


Garden, Home and Garden

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reclaimed garden seating

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You might be thinking that the end of November is a bit of a funny time to be thinking about your garden.  I’m a staunch believer that winter is the very best time to plan your garden.  You want to be sowing seeds in around about March/April time, so taking some time to really think about want you want to grow and where is, in my books, time never wasted.

Also, right now I am itching to overhaul our garden.  I had hoped to do it in the summer of this year, but sadly the funds we’d saved up to do the garden had to be spent on other things that popped up unexpectedly.  We are now currently saving towards the garden improvement fund, and using this time to plan out our garden.

It’s been quite fun – I love doing stuff like this – and I thought I’d share some of the sustainable garden ideas that I’m keen to incorporate into our future garden:

Reclaimed Materials

reclaimed garden seating

I’m keen to use as many reclaimed materials as possible in the garden for two reasons – to keep costs down and to make the garden greener.  I’d love to create some seating in the garden, and I came across this reclaimed seating made from glass bottles, building waste, rocks and scaffold boards.  It was designed by Ben Chandler and is a thing of beauty!

Green Roofs

bike shed green roof

I’ve mentioned before that I’d love to install a green roof on top of our bike shed, like this one found here.  As well as being visually stunning, it adds a little bit more biodiversity into your garden in an otherwise unused area.

Water Conservation

sustainable garden ideas

Water is a precious resource, so conserving it is a priority.  We have bog standard water butts on our allotment, but in your garden you might want something a little easier on the eye.  I came across this barrel style water butt on Pumpkin Beth and think something like this might fit the bill better in our garden.

Wildlife Ponds

wildlife pond

Something my partner would absolutely love to do is to add a small wildlife pond to our garden, like this beautiful example found here.  Given that our garden is tiny then something this size is out of the question, but in truth, even a small wildlife pond can be beneficial to local wildlife, providing a refuge and a home to freshwater creatures.

Over the last 100 years it’s estimated that the UK has lost almost half a million ponds, threatening freshwater species, so adding even a small barrel pond specially designed with wildlife in mind.  Here’s a handy guide on how to make one in a barrel or bucket if like me, space is at a premium.

Planting Native Speciessustainable garden design ideas

Another thing I’m to do is to plant as many native species as possible, including bee friendly native plants to help support wildlife. I’m thinking alliums, bluebells, honeysuckle, fox gloves, comfrey and hellebores.

Vegetable wise, right now I’m avidly pouring over the Real Seeds seeds selection.  They sell heirloom and heritage vegetable seeds -with the promise of no F1 hybrids or genetically modified seeds.  This means you can even save your own vegetable seed for future years, meaning there’s no need to buy new seed every year, and your vegetables adapt to your local conditions.  Although we grow most of our vegetables on our allotment, will like to keep some herbs to hand in our garden for easy pickings, and we’ve found that courgettes grow better in our garden than on the allotment bizarrely.

Although we endeavour to do much of the work ourselves to save money, if doing work on your garden yourself sounds a bit out of your skill level then I found a handy table that guides you through how much garden design might cost you.  Any good gardener/landscaper will be able to incorporate sustainable garden ideas into your garden design, so it’s no bad thing if you don’t/can’t go down the DIY route.