Looking to reduce your food waste?  Let me share with you some top tips to make fresh food last longer.

Food waste is a huge issue. In fact, food production is one of the biggest contributors to climate change. So much so, that about one-third of greenhouse emissions globally come from agriculture.

Despite this, both at the household level and at the manufacturing level, we are very wasteful when it comes to food. 30% of the food we produce is wasted – about 1.8 billion tonnes of it a year. So much so, that it has been estimated that if food waste was a country, it would be the third-highest emitter of greenhouse gases after the US and China.  Isn’t that terrifying?

Useful Tips to Make Fresh Food Last Longer

The good thing is that there are lots of things we can do at home to reduce food waste.  I’ve come across this really useful infographic which has some great tips to make fresh food last longer.

Any long term Moral Fibres readers might already know the first tip, but there were a couple here that were new to me.  I didn’t know that you shouldn’t refrigerate tomatoes, and I also wasn’t aware that you should ideally store cheese in cardboard.   I’ll be giving that Tupperware container in my fridge that’s full of cheese the side-eye then…!

See what you will learn:

Make Fresh Food Last Longer

Via Pounds to Pocket

What More Can I Do?

I have lots more food waste tips you can follow at home to reduce your food waste. However, the buck shouldn’t just stop with householders.  Food manufacturers have a huge part to play in reducing food waste. The good news is that there is a host of companies out there, making not just one product, but their entire range from surplus food, or food waste.  Check out my post on the food waste heroes helping to save the planet to be inspired. 

You can also sign this petition to help stop food waste within supermarket supply chains. 

ps: if you like this post on tips to make fresh food last longer, then check out my ten more tips to reduce food waste

Found this post useful?  You can buy me a coffee to help support the site’s running costs.  Alternatively, please support the site by sharing this post with your friends, following along on Instagram, or signing up for the free Moral Fibres monthly newsletter.