weekend links

Ten Things

range cooker

Hello! How’s your week been? I’ve had a lovely week off work with my little people, holidaying at home; lamenting Brexit; and finishing up some DIY projects around our house. I’ve also been working on some DIYs for the blog – coming up next week!

I’ve also been planning what to cover on the blog in the coming months, so if there is anything in particular that you’d like to see me write about then do let me know!

This week’s links:

1. In seriously impressive news, the ‘Attenborough effect’ leads to a 53% drop in single-use plastic in 12 months.

Over half of consumers polled in a study said they have reduced the amount of disposable plastic they have been using in the last year, and 42% say products that use sustainable materials are important when it comes to their day-to-day purchases.

2. Norway is in the news again – they have refused to drill for billions of barrels of oil in the Arctic, leaving the whole oil industry surprised and disappointed. The move creates a large parliamentary majority against oil exploration in the sensitive offshore area, illustrating growing opposition to the polluting fossil fuel, which has made the country one of the world’s most affluent.

3. People with asthma are being encouraged to use “greener” inhalers by the NHS, if it is suitable for them.

Around 70% of inhalers used in the UK are the types that have high levels of greenhouse gases  – “environmentally-friendly” dry powder inhalers contain 25 times fewer pollutants. If anyone is thinking about changing their inhaler or needs advice, it is recommended that they visit their GP or asthma nurse.

4. Climate change: yes, your individual action does make a difference.

Individual action is part of the collective. So, while you won’t save the world on your own, you might be part of the solution“.

5. Buying new is not sustainable, not matter how you sew it.

Regardless of how consumption is greenwashed, the ongoing promotion of wants over needs creates an aspirational culture, in which acquisition of the right products is the pinnacle of self-empowerment. No matter how you brand it, buying anything new – especially within the constant churn of the trend cycle – can never be sustainable“.

6. “We can change it all if we want it all, and we do“.

7. Britons throw away 720m eggs a year over best-before date fears – here’s how to test if an egg is fresh or not, regardless of it’s best before date.

8. This is really interesting – a Bristol nursery is trialing a no-toys rule for a month, to see what effect it has on the children. So far kids have been playing outside more often; playing with each other more; and there are positive reports from parents, with one saying “a box becomes a spaceship, a stick becomes a wand, they become a wizard“. This comes at a time when 1 in 4 parents have admitted to throwing away toys that are in perfect working order.

9. Flipping loved the guy in this video.

10. Finally, would you support a climate label for food?

Have a great week!

Wendy.x

Food & Drink, Kitchen Staples

AD | Plastic-Free Instant Coffee – Finally!

plastic-free instant coffee uk

Paid-for content in association with Little’s.

I’ve never understood why up until now it’s been so difficult to find plastic-free instant coffee. Most instant coffee is sold in jars with plastic lids – why not switch the plastic lid to a metal lid and the job’s done?

Thankfully, one instant coffee brand has taken the initiative and switched to plastic-free packaging: Little’s Coffee.

Little’s Coffee is a small independent family business, selling 100% Arabica coffee, and they are proud to now be 100% plastic-free. Spearheaded by husband and wife duo Henry and Leila Little 25 years ago, the business is now run by their son, Will Little, and his wife, Caroline. By taking the lead on removing plastic from their jars of instant coffee, this small company is definitely leagues ahead of the big boys of coffee.

Their delicious range of instant coffee is all packaged in glass jars with 100% aluminum lids, both of which materials, unlike plastic, can be infinitely recycled, which is much better for the environment.

Rather than popping mine in the appropriate recycling bins once I’ve finished my coffee, I’m planning on recycling my Little’s jars in different ways. Call me a geek, but I do like a good jar, and Little’s jars look so very good. I have plans to use them either in my kitchen for food storage, or for health & beauty DIYs, before recycling them appropriately at the end of their lives.

Of course, it’s not just all about the packaging. The plastic-free packaging is all well and good but the coffee has to taste good too. Thankfully, Little’s delivers above and beyond on this point. The 100% Arabica coffee is gently brewed with no nasties to deliver a smooth and tasty single blend plastic-free instant coffee that’s available in both caffeinated and decaffeinated options.

Their decaf coffee is made still using the best quality 100% Arabica coffee and decaffeinated using a gentle CO2 process. This process retains all the coffee’s great natural taste, without the use of chemicals that are used in solvent-based decaffeination processes.

Flavoured Instant Coffee

plastic-free instant coffee

As well as standard coffee, Little’s star of the show is their flavour infused instant coffees, which has evolved to suit peoples busy lifestyles. Available in a wide range of flavours – from Cardamom Bun, to Gingerbread Cookie, to Irish Cream flavoured coffee – I counted 13 different flavours of plastic-free coffee to choose from, all modestly priced between £2.99 and £3.20 a jar.

To be honest, I’ve never been a big fan of flavoured coffees, finding the taste of coffee syrups too sweet, and the process of measuring out sticky syrups being a bit of a faff. I was surprised to find that Little’s range of pre-flavoured coffee (again, available in caffeinated and decaffeinated) has no added sugar. This means their coffee hits the spot without the intense sugary sweetness that coffee syrups often have, and can be whipped up in the same time it takes to make a cup of regular coffee.

I bought some Chocolate Caramel coffee and some Island Coconut coffee and both make great pick-me-ups to combat the 2 pm post-lunch slump. At only 4 calories a cup, the coffee is better for you than raiding the biscuit tin for that chocolate hit! Needless to say, I’ve got jar of Little’s at work now to help keep me out of the biscuit tin.

Without being overly sweet, the Chocolate Caramel coffee smells and to me tastes just like tiramisu – my partner hates all coffee but even he conceded that the coffee smelled delicious. A world first, let me tell you! The Island Coconut coffee is not too dissimilar to a Bounty bar, which is a very good thing in my book. It’s a great way to liven up your coffee!

Where to Buy Little’s Plastic-Free Coffee

Little’s Coffee is available across the UK and is stocked in Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Ocado, Holland & Barrett, Dobbies Garden Centres, Booths, Whole Foods Market, Selfridges & Co, and Harvey Nichols.

Little’s also has an online shop if you can’t find a jar near you. I ordered my coffee from their online shop and was delighted to find that it shipped in a cardboard box sealed with paper tape – no plastic to be found – not even a shred of bubble wrap.

If you’re shopping online too, Little’s Coffee has kindly set up a discount code for Moral Fibres readers: use the discount code MORALFIBRES10 at the checkout of the Little’s Coffee webshop for 10% off your order.

Visit the Little’s online shop here for delicious coffee in recyclable packaging, and pay them a visit on Instagram for colourful coffee-related content!