Tag

food waste

Food & Drink, Food Waste Tips

Can You Freeze Oat Milk?

Can you freeze oat milk? That is the burning question we all want to know the answer to!

Whilst any non-dairy milk is great for the environment compared to cows milk, not all non-dairy milk is equal. Oat milk is a great sustainable choice – it’s better for the environment than many other vegan milk substitutes such as almond, coconut, and rice milk.

As such, we drink lots of oat milk in our house. Whilst we almost always finish an opened carton of oat milk, on the odd occasion when we are going away somewhere for a few days and can’t take the milk with us poses a problem.

In those instances, it feels wrong to pour perfectly good oat milk down the drain, so I have looked for ways to preserve my precious oaty goodness.

can you freeze oat milk

Yes, You Can Freeze Oat Milk!

Good news: it turns out that yes, you can freeze oat milk.

Oat milk settles in the freezing process, so it can be a little grainy when you defrost it, however, it’s completely fine to use. Due to the graininess, I personally would not use defrosted oat milk in my tea, coffee, or cereal. However, when heated up you don’t notice the graininess, and it’s great for use in cooking.

For that reason, I tend to freeze oat milk in an ice-cube tray so I have pre-portioned sizes of frozen milk on hand that I add directly to sauces. Pre-portioning the milk before freezing also means you can add it to your cooking without the need to defrost the milk beforehand.

Frozen cubes can also be added to smoothies. Because you’re blending the smoothie, this means you won’t detect any graininess.

I’ve also found that Oatly Barista Milk separates when it’s frozen – it’s made with rapeseed oil so the oil tends to rise to the top. However, giving it a good mix when you are cooking sorts that all out.

I use a plastic ice-cube tray because I’ve had it forever, and binning it and replacing it with a metal ice-cube tray is not in any way sustainable. However, if you don’t have an ice-cube tray you can get lovely metal ones*.

Your oat milk should be good for up to three months in the freezer.

I had tried freezing milk in jars, but unless your recipe calls for a lot of milk then I’ve found the milk just languished in my fridge for too long. The last time I tried this method we ended up having to pour a jar of milk down the drain as nobody wanted it in their cup of tea, so ice-cube trays all the way now!

Never refreeze already defrosted oat milk, and as always, make sure your milk hasn’t expired before freezing it.

What About Freezing Soy Milk Or Any Other Type of Non-Dairy Milk?

All other types of no-dairy milk (and regular cows milk) can be frozen. Again, they might go grainy like oat milk, or may lose some of their texture or taste, so I’d always recommend the ice-cube tray method.

Garden, Home and Garden

How to Compost In A Flat

Joy from Sustainable Jungle, a sustainable living blog, and podcast, is here today to share her how to compost in a flat knowledge with Moral Fibres readers. Joy has been composting in her flat for six months and is keen to share her multi-pronged attack so other flat dwellers can learn from her composting experience:


how to compost in an apartment

Our introduction to the concept of composting started in London in 2017. We had just been on an epic honeymoon through Africa. The time we spent in some of the most impressive and raw places on earth, like Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda and the Serengeti in Tanzania, delivered the harsh realisation that we, personally, were doing nothing truly positive for the environment and the ecosystems we care so much about.

So we started investigating living more sustainably, using the fantastic online resources available and made some important changes, one of which was composting. We thought we were rather smart because we discovered that “composting” in a flat in the London Borough of Camden is pretty simple – you collect your food scraps (including citrus and bones) in a caddy and leave it out on the street once a week for the council to collect it. Nice n Easy…

Then… we moved home to Australia. And we discovered very quickly that Australia is generally quite behind on making the most of food waste. We’d become so used to our empty, stink-free waste bins and found ourselves starting our composting journey from scratch. We also moved into a flat… which as it turns out, makes composting a little harder.

Six months on and there have been many iterations. We’ve certainly got a long way to go but we’re pretty happy with how far we’ve come. So much so that we are keen to share our current setup and experience with any flat dwellers looking to divert that valuable food waste from landfill, and perhaps even use some nutrient-rich compost on their own mini apartment garden.

How To Compost In A Flat

Aside from meal planning and better use of the full fruit or vegetable to reduce the amount of food scraps we need to get rid of in the first place, we are currently running the following setup:

Vermicomposting on the Balcony

composting in a flat
Joy’s vermicomposter

We didn’t want to overcommit to a worm farm until we were confident we wouldn’t kill our worm babies, so instead, we invested in a kid’s ‘learn to worm’ type vermicomposter*. I’m pleased to report that we have managed to keep our worms alive, even through a brutal Australian summer!

We love our worms, they make this amazing worm tea (stink free worm wee) which we use on our plants, both indoor and outdoor. This, along with the worm castings, really seem to make a huge difference to our plants’ health. This vermicomposter takes on about 10-20% of our weekly waste (given its quite small) and while worms can eat almost anything, there are some scraps they don’t eat so we had to find other solutions to deal with our remaining food scraps.

worm tea
Joy’s plants thrive on her worm tea

Bokashi Bins on the Balcony

how to compost in a flat
Joy’s bokashi bins

We had grand plans for our bokashi bins*. We were going to keep them inside to make life just that bit more convenient. They’re not supposed to smell and they’re supposed to convert things like bones, onions and orange peels (which worms don’t like) into something that worms can eat, or that can be easily composted in a traditional composter.

They indeed do a good job of converting hard-to-compost items, and they take on another 10-20% of our waste, but boy, do the ones we purchased stink! Our advice after this experience is to absolutely invest in good quality bokashi bins that have a really, really strong seal. Needless to say, our bokashi bins have been banished to the balcony and we’re looking for a suitable indoor version. Worth noting if you want to try this at home: you need at least 2 bokashi bins (for 2 people) as you need to alternate them – one bokashi does its fermenting job while the other one gets filled with scraps.

Local Community Garden, via ShareWaste App

food waste ideas

Probably the most impactful discovery for us was the ShareWaste App, which helped us find a community garden close by and in need of food scraps for their big composters. Our process is to collect our daily scraps in a bowl as we chop and cook. We then transfer to a big plastic bucket once a day and then take this bucket (with our remaining 70-80% of food scraps) to the community garden once a week.

It sounds like a big schlep but it really isn’t. It’s become part of our habit and the garden is near our local dog park where we take our little pooch anyway. We were thrilled to find that our family members have also used the ShareWaste app to find people in their local community who are now gratefully accepting their food scraps too. My mum takes her foods scraps across the road to her neighbour, and now has a new friend too!

So there you have it! I’d say we are intermediate apartment composters now. We still have some work to do both to reduce our waste but also to process our own. This is what we plan to tackle next:

  • Indoor Bokashi: We’re on a mission to find the best indoor, stink-free option
  • Make vegetable stock: This is a bit of a no-brainer, we just need to build the habit.
  • Dog poop composting: We now have a puppy and he is a poop machine. We have a somewhat zero waste approach now but it could be better.
  • Traditional composter: We’re really getting into balcony gardening so we plan to experiment with a traditional composter so we can keep some of that compost goodness for our own garden.

Composting in a flat sure is an art and unless you have heaps of space, it’s likely you need a multi-pronged approach, especially if you don’t have a balcony. I hope that sharing our experience has helped the aspiring flat composters out there, and if you have found a great way of dealing with food waste, please do share your tips on how to compost in a flat – both with us and those around you!