Tag

zero waste

Ethical Fashion, Life & Style

Zero Waste Fashion: The Best Brands To Know

Learn about the zero waste fashion brands that are redesigning fashion, through their eco-friendly approaches to clothing design.

In order to help support the running costs of Moral Fibres, this post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. Moral Fibres may earn a small commission, at no extra cost to readers, on items that have been purchased through those links.

Zero waste fashion is the ultimate goal when it comes to ethical clothing. With the fashion world being a notoriously wasteful industry, we desperately need brands who are cleaning up fashion and reducing waste.

But what is zero waste fashion exactly? Confusingly, the term actually has multiple meanings. At the base of it, everyone agrees that zero waste fashion is a type of ethical fashion.

From there, definitions deviate. Some people say that zero waste fashion is where a clothing brand participates in the circular economy by using deadstock fabric or waste materials to create brand new items of clothing from items that would otherwise be binned.

Others view zero waste fashion as when a clothing brand does not produce any textile waste at all. Or at the very least, creating only very minimal waste. This could be achieved by employing clever cutting techniques to minimise offcuts, or by creating other products out of remnants or offcuts to help reduce or avoid fabric wastage.

The Best Zero Waste Fashion Brands

Image of a person making clothes with a blue text box that says zero waste fashion: the best brands to know.

The good news is that whatever your interpretation of zero-waste fashion may be, there are some incredibly exciting and innovative brands out there tackling the scourge that is fabric waste. All whilst making some seriously stylish clothing.

To help you out, here are some of my favourite zero-waste fashion brands who are either keeping clothes out of landfill, or are creating clothing out of materials that would otherwise go to waste.

The price range key for this guide is:

 £ = Under £50 | ££ = £50 – 100 | £££ = £100+

Beyond Retro

Zero waste fashion from Beyond Retro

Budget: £ – ££

Caters for: sizes XS – XXL

Beyond Retro* is an online treasure trove of vintage and secondhand clothing for men and women, carefully sourced from around the world. You can shop by clothing type, by brand, by era, and even by type of fabric should you wish to avoid synthetic fibres. What’s more, Beyond Retro also has dedicated plus-size sections for both men and women, catering up to size XXL. There is also the ability to search for unisex clothing.

As well as saving clothes from landfill, for extra zero waste points Beyond Retro also offer their Reworked range*. Here, new items are made from vintage clothing, meaning your piece is totally unique. Beyond Retro says that only 1 in 1,000 vintage items are suitable for sale. Reworking clothes that are otherwise unsellable help lower this number and delivers a more zero-waste-minded fashion.

Use the exclusive code MORALFIBRES at the checkout to receive 15% off your order at Beyond Retro.

Do also check out my full guide to shopping for secondhand clothes online, for more ideas of where to shop secondhand.

Boyish Jeans

A person wearing Boyish Jeans zero waste jeans

Budget: £££

Caters for sizes: XS – XL

Boyish Jeans* work exclusively with recycled fabrics and materials to create their stylish denim products – from jeans to jackets and more. This means that their zero-waste clothing has a much smaller impact, particularly in terms of water usage.

As well as using recycled fabrics, Boyish Jeans also employ ethical and sustainable practices when developing and manufacturing its products.

Do also check out my full guide to ethical jeans for more denim-based inspiration.

Christy Dawn’s Zero Waste Fashion

A person wearing a blue floral Christy Dawn dress

Budget: £££

Caters for sizes S – XL

When it comes to high-end women’s zero waste fashion, then look no further than Christy Dawn*. The Christy Dawn team shun new fabrics. Instead, they spend their time rummaging through piles of leftover and discontinued fabric – what’s known as deadstock.

When they find the fabric they love, their team of artisans cut, sew, and finish each piece in their Los Angeles factory. Making limited-edition runs from existing fabric in this manner means each version of a style is very limited. This means there’s little chance of being seen in the same dress as anyone else.

Find Christy Dawn for sale in the UK via Content Beauty*.

ColieCo

A person wearing a ColieCo bra

Budget: £ – ££

Caters for: sizes 30B to 36DD – custom sizing is also available

Even underwear gets the zero waste treatment. ColieCo*, for example, sells very fashion-led lingerie, all made by hand in Portugal in a zero-waste manner. Here, only recycled, reused, and reclaimed fabrics are used. And what’s more, your underwear is only posted to you using biodegradable and recyclable packaging. 

Sizes for their soft and underwired bras range from 30B to 36DD.  However, ColieCo does take requests for custom sizes.

Innermettle

A person wearing Innermettle's knickers made from surplus milk

Budget: £

Caters for: UK sizes 8 – 16

Innermettle’s* zero waste knickers are made from surplus milk.  It sounds unusual, but the protein casein can be separated from sour milk to make fabric and tackle milk waste at the same time. I have to admit, I was initially sceptical. However, I’ve tried Innermettle’s Milk Innerwear underwear out and it strangely works!

Their underwear is very smooth and soft (and I promise it doesn’t smell of milk!) and feels similar to cashmere or silk on your skin. It can be chemical-intensive to make milk-based fabrics, however, Innermettle uses a technique that they say is free from harsh chemicals.

Use the exclusive discount code MORALFIBRES25 at the checkout to take 25% off any product in the Milk Innerwear collection.

Pantee

A person wearing Pantee's deadstock fabric underwear

Budget: £

Caters for: sizes 28A to 38F

Pantee* is a new ethical underwear brand, catering for bra sizes 28A to 38F. What makes Pantee a zero waste fashion brand is that they upcycle unsold t-shirts that have been left unworn and are destined for landfill, into soft and supportive bras and briefs.  

All of their styles are underwire-free. In case you are worried about support, each bra is double-layered for extra comfort and support. Their bras are all £38, regardless of style.

Rokit’s Zero-Waste Vintage Fashion

The Rokit vintage shopfront

Budget: £ – ££

Caters for: sizes XXXS to XXL

Finally, Rokit* sells a vast collection of pre-worn vintage & designer secondhand clothes in the UK that can be bought online. From sports, street, designer to vintage, whatever your style, Rokit stocks it. And with a vast inventory, covering sizes XXXS to XXL, Rokit’s size inclusivity is something to applaud.

To minimise waste within the vintage clothing industry, Rokit has also developed its own Rokit Originals Range. This is a collection of reworked vintage pieces, that gives a new life to old garments and creates new items to be loved over the long term, keeping old clothes out of landfill.

I’ll be sure to update this guide – so do check back or pin it for later. In the meantime, why not share it with your friends to help spread the zero-waste fashion love.

Arts & Crafts, Life & Style

How to Make Beeswax Wraps Cheaply & Easily

beeswax food wrap diy

Are you looking to make beeswax food wraps? Let me show you just how easy and cheap it can be with this full DIY guide.

Hello!  It’s been a little while since I shared a DIY with you, but today I want to share my tried and tested technique for how to make beeswax wraps.  If you’re looking to reduce your single-use plastic consumption, then these beeswax wraps make for a great alternative to using cling film, tin foil, or plastic Tupperware to store food in.  And the best part is they are really easy to make.

We actually stopped using cling film and tin foil a long time ago.  We switched to using parchment paper to wrap our food in before popping it in the fridge or freezer or storing food in glass jars or Tupperware tubs.

All of this has been doing the job pretty well.  However, I’ve been trying to find an alternative to parchment paper as I’d like to be able to not buy so many single-use products, like parchment paper.  I also wanted to find a way to transport my lunch without the need for bulky Tupperware tubs.  Those things are a pain to carry around all day!  So, lo and behold, the answer I was looking for: the beeswax food wrap!

how to make beeswax wraps

I had seen some pretty nice ones for sale online, but the statutory maternity pay I’m on at the moment sadly doesn’t quite stretch to beeswax wraps.  I had some fabric scraps left over from an old craft project.  And I also some beeswax pellets leftover from making beeswax candles and homemade nappy rash cream so decided to try my hand at making my own.  How hard could it be? Turns out, not very hard at all.  Let me share with you now my easy method on how to make beeswax wraps.

how to store food without plastic

How to Make Beeswax Wraps

Contains affiliate links denoted by *

You will need

Freshly washed and dried fabric scraps* – a variety of sizes.

Beeswax pellets*

A silicone basting brush*

Oven tray

Tongs*

Method

Preheat your oven to 85°C (185°F)

Lay your piece of fabric flat on your oven tray.  Sprinkle the fabric liberally with your beeswax pellets.

Place in the oven for around 5 minutes, until the beeswax has all melted.  Keep an eye on it the whole time to avoid burning.

Once all the beeswax has melted remove the tray from the oven and quickly use your silicone basting brush to evenly distribute the beeswax.  The beeswax will start to set as soon as you take it out of the oven so you want to do this bit very quickly.

As soon as you’ve done this use the tongs to remove the fabric and hang it up to dry.  It will take only minutes to set and then it’s ready for use. To do this, using the tongs, I hold my fabric above the tray for a minute to allow the beeswax to set (and to catch any drips), then I drape the fabric on my washing line.

If you find you’ve got too much beeswax on your fabric then simply place it back in the oven for a few minutes until the beeswax has melted. Then brush down with your silicone brush again.

To remove the beeswax from your oven tray and basting brush, wash them in hot soapy water.

Have fun making these beeswax wraps – I find it can get a bit addictive!

How to use beeswax wraps

You can use beeswax wraps in practically any way you see fit – for example wrapping cheese.  Just wrap the cheese in the wrap and use the heat from your hands to seal the ends.  Got a leftover bowl of food?  Simply place a beeswax wrap on top and again, using the heat from your hands, seal the wrap around the edges.  The uses are endless!

See my notes on usage below for some more handy hints.

Beeswax Snack Pouches

how to fold beeswax wraps

My eldest daughter loves the little snack boxes of raisins.  I’ve found it’s cheaper and less wasteful on the packaging front to buy a big 1 kg bag of raisins and make my own little snack packs of raisins using the beeswax food wraps and a bit of origami.

how to fold beeswax wraps uk

1. Take a square of beeswax coated fabric and fold diagonally, as in picture two.

2.  Fold down the left-hand corner, as in picture 3.

3.  Next, fold down the left-hand corner like in picture 4, lining up the edge with the previous fold.

4.  Now fold down the triangle that’s sticking up at the top.

5.  Flip it over and fold down the other triangle.

6. Finally, open it up and fill it with raisins or any other snack of your choice

To seal, fold down the flap on the side that doesn’t have any folds in it. Then you are good to go!

origami fold

Beeswax Wraps Usage Tips

There are a few points to remember when using beeswax wraps.

Heat & Cold Considerations

Firstly, the most important thing to remember is beeswax melts at a low-ish temperature. To be precise, the melting point of beeswax is around 62°C to 64°C. Therefore, any use that is going to be around or above that temperature is a big no-no.  Think cold.

I, therefore, wouldn’t recommend using your wrap directly on hot food.  Let the food cool first before wrapping it.

And like cling film, your beeswax wrap is for food storage only. Don’t use them in your oven or microwave.  The beeswax will melt and will leave a big mess that will not be fun to clean up.

You can freeze your fabric wraps.  I wouldn’t use it for long-term freezer storage though – only for the food that you plan on freezing in the short term.  I would suggest that your wraps spend no longer than one month at a time in the freezer.

How To Wash Beeswax Wraps

With these heat considerations in mind, wash your beeswax food wrap in cold soapy water using a gentle eco-friendly washing-up liquid, like Bio D*.  I would avoid using alcohol-based washing-up liquid as it can degrade your beeswax.  I would also recommend leaving your wraps to air dry. Whatever you do, don’t leave them on your radiator to dry!

I also wouldn’t recommend putting your wraps in your dishwasher or washing machine.  And definitely not your tumble drier!

beeswax food wrap

Food Safety

If you eat meat, then I would avoid placing your beeswax wrap in direct contact with raw meat. This is because you can’t wash your wrap in hot water to sterilise it.  If you want to store raw meat using your wrap, I would put the meat in a bowl and use the wrap to cover the bowl.

What To Do When Your Wrap Stops Folding

When your beeswax food wrap stops losing the ability to fold, simply wash and re-wax it in the same manner as above.

How to make beeswax wraps cheaply and easily