Wondering how to make fresh-smelling pine-infused vinegar for cleaning? Read on for my full how-to.

I love making my own cleaning sprays. I have made my own herb-infused vinegar for cleaning before, but I’ve never made any with pine.

I really love the smell of pine. It’s a fresh smell I associate with cleaning, and as such, I quite often use pine essential oil in my homemade cleaning products. However, I’ve never had any fresh pine to hand to try it out in my cleaning products.

And then recently I was walking in my local country park and I noticed a load of pine branches on the ground. I wasn’t sure if some trees had been felled, or whether some of the strong winds had knocked the branches off. Either way, I picked up a couple of small branches that were lying on the ground and decided it was time to make pine-infused vinegar.

Like any infused vinegar, it’s incredibly easy to make. Here’s the full how to, so you can make it too!

How To Make Pine Infused Vinegar For Cleaning

Image of a jar of pine needles, with a blue text box that says how to make pine-infused vinegar for cleaning with.

You Will Need

To make pine-infused vinegar, you will need:

  • A clean and dry glass jar with a lid
  • A few pine branches – just enough to fill your jar
  • White spirit vinegar
  • Optional – orange, lemon, grapefruit or lime peel
  • A clean, dry spray bottle

Method

Gather your pine branches. Then give them a shake to remove any bugs and beasties that might be residing in the branches.

Next, pop the pine branches into your jar. You may need to cut them into smaller sections using scissors, if your branches are too long.

If you have any citrus peel, feel free to add these too for a extra fresh scent burst.

Next, pour in your vinegar until it reaches the top. Your branches and peel, if you added any, should be submerged.

Finally, pop the lid on, and let the ingredients infuse for at least two weeks in a cool, dark place. The cupboard under your kitchen sink is an ideal place for this. Two weeks would be the bare minimum. For stronger pine scented vinegar, leave the pine steeping for longer. I’ve left herbs and citrus infusing for as much as six months, for stronger smelling infused vinegar.

How To Use Pine-Infused Vinegar

Once you’ve finished infusing your vinegar, use a colander or seive, and strain the mixture into a measuring jug. Place the pine branches (and citrus peel, if you used it) into your compost bin.

Next, fill your clean, dry spray bottle half way with the pine infused vinegar. Then top the bottle up with cooled boiled water, so that is it a 50:50 vinegar/water mix. Pop any unused vinegar back in your jar, and pop the lid on.

Any unused and undiluted vinegar will last indefinitely. When made with cooled boiled water, your cleaning spray will have a shelf-life of around 6 to 8 weeks. If you use water straight from the tap, the shelf life is considerably less, so I would always recommend boiling and cooling your water first.

Spray your cloth with the spray, and you can get wiping, for a home that will smell forest fresh!

What Can I Clean?

pine infused cleaner

You can use your pine-infused vinegar to clean almost every area of your home. However, do note there are a few applications that vinegar is not suitable for use.

White vinegar isn’t suitable for cleaning natural stone, or granite, marble, quartz, or similar. This is because vinegar can be corrosive to these materials, and may etch the surface.

Metallic paint is another no-no. So avoid using vinegar-based cleaners to clean your car. 

Also, do not mix your cleaner with cleaning products that contain bleach or hydrogen peroxide, as doing so can release poisonous gases that can harm your airways.

I would always recommending reading my guide on everything you need to know about cleaning with white vinegar, as it talks you through all these points and more.

Is Pine-Infused Vinegar Pet Safe?

I have read conflicting reports on whether pine is toxic to cats or not. From what I have read, pine trees are not toxic to cats or dogs, however pine essential oil is toxic to cats and dogs.

My thoughts are that infusing pine in vinegar means the pine is diluted to a concentration that shouldn’t harm your pets. Especially so, when you add water to make your cleaning spray. However, if you have pets, then I would encourage you to carry out your own research, to decide if using this cleaner is the right option for you.

If you do make the cleaner, make sure your jar is kept sealed and away from pets to avoid ingestion.

Printable Version

Here’s the printable version of this recipe, if you would like to print it out.

How to Make Pine-Infused Vinegar For Cleaning

Make your home smell forest fresh with this easy guide to making your own pine-infused vinegar.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 2 bottles

Ingredients

  • 3 handfuls Pine branches – just enough to fill your jar
  • 1 bottle White spirit vinegar
  • 1 handful Optional – orange, lemon, grapefruit or lime peel

Instructions

  1. Gather your pine branches. Then give them a shake to remove any bugs and beasties that might be residing in the branches.

  2. Next, pop the pine branches into your jar. You may need to cut them into smaller sections using scissors, if your branches are too long.

  3. If you have any citrus peel, feel free to add these too for a extra fresh scent burst.

  4. Next, pour in your vinegar until it reaches the top. Your branches and peel, if you added any, should be submerged.

  5. Finally, pop the lid on, and let the ingredients infuse for at least two weeks in a cool, dark place. The cupboard under your kitchen sink is an ideal place for this. Two weeks would be the bare minimum. For stronger pine scented vinegar, leave the pine steeping for longer. I’ve left herbs and citrus infusing for as much as six months, for stronger smelling infused vinegar.

Recipe Notes

Once you’ve finished infusing your vinegar, use a colander or seive, and strain the mixture into a measuring jug. Place the pine branches (and citrus peel, if you used it) into your compost bin.

Next, fill your clean, dry spray bottle half way with the pine infused vinegar. Then top the bottle up with cooled boiled water, so that is it a 50:50 vinegar/water mix. Pop any unused vinegar back in your jar, and pop the lid on.

Any unused and undiluted vinegar will last indefinitely. When made with cooled boiled water, your cleaning spray will have a shelf-life of around 6 to 8 weeks. If you use water straight from the tap, the shelf life is considerably less, so I would always recommend boiling and cooling your water first.

Spray your cloth with the spray, and you can get wiping, for a home that will smell forest fresh!

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