my zero waste kitchen dk books jane turner

Zero Waste Crisps Recipe

zero waste crisps recipe

Dorling Kindersley have recently released My Zero Waste Kitchen, a really useful zero waste cookbook and guide by Kate Turner.  Full of smart and simple ideas to shop, plan, cook, and eat waste free, as well as with ten recipes to use up leftovers and food scraps, it’s a handy guide to have at your fingertips.

Dorling Kindersley have kindly let me share this great recipe from the book for zero waste crisps with Moral Fibres readers.  Kate’s recipe lets you transform potato peelings or old veg into these moreish crisps, creating a healthy zero waste snack from leftover veg!  Each recipe in the book contains three zero waste twists to give suggestions on how to customise the recipe depending on what you have to hand, and to encourage you to get creative with the contents of your fridge.  This recipe is no exception – you’ll find three zero waste twists at the end.

SERVES 2

Ingredients

50g potato peel from around 2 large potatoes
½ tbsp olive oil
A generous pinch of chilli powder
½ tsp sweet smoked paprika powder
¼ tsp salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
50g kale leaves

FIRST MAKE THE BASE
  1.  Preheat the oven to 150ºC (300ºF/Gas 2) and line 2–3 baking trays with baking parchment.
  2. Place the potato peel in a mixing bowl with half of the oil, spices, salt, and pepper.  Using your hands (wear gloves if necessary), gently rub the peel until it is completely coated with oil and spices.  Set aside.
  3. Using a sharp knife, remove the tough, woody kale stems and roughly chop the leaves in to bite-sized pieces.
  4. Place the kale in a mixing bowl with the remaining oil, spices, salt, and pepper.  Gently rub the kale for 1–2 minutes until it is completely coated and starting to soften.
  5. Spread the potato peel and kale thinly on separate baking trays in single, even layers.  Set the kale tray aside.
  6. Place the potato peel in the oven and leave to roast for 25 minutes.  After 10 minutes, add the kale tray and continue roasting for the remaining 15 minutes, or until crisp.  Watch carefully to ensure they don’t burn.
  7. Remove the crisps from the oven and leave on the trays for a few minutes to crisp up before eating.
  8. The crisps are best eaten within a few hours, but can be stored in an airtight container for 1–2 days.  Re-crisp them in the oven at a low temperature for 3–4 minutes.

NOW ZERO-WASTE IT!

SWEET POTATO AND POTATO PEEL CRISPS

Swap the kale for the peel of 2 large sweet potatoes – about 50g.  Combine with the regular potato peel and season as per the recipe.  Roast both for 25 minutes, or until crisp.

TIRED PARSNIP AND POTATO PEEL CRISPS

Swap the kale for 1 parsnip – about 100g.  Slice very thinly, either with a mandolin or a vegetable peeler, including tops and tails.  Season, spread thinly on a baking tray, and roast for around 35 minutes, or until crisp.  Thicker slices may need an extra 5 minutes, but watch carefully to ensure they don’y burn.  Add the potato peel tray to the oven for the last 25 minutes.

TIRED BEETROOT AND POTATO PEEL CRISPS

Swap the kale for 1 beetroot – about 100g.  Slice very thinly either with a mandolin or a vegetable peeler, including tops and tails.  Season, spread thinly on a baking tray, and roast for around 35 minutes, or until crisp.  Thicker slices may need an extra 5 minutes, but watch carefully to ensure they don’t burn.  Add the potato peel tray to the oven for the last 25 minutes.

Or simply combine all the vegetables to create a rainbow of flavours and colours.

My Zero-Waste Kitchen by Kate Turner is published by DK. £6.99, DK.com

Readly review 2017

Readly Review

Readly review 2017

Are you a big magazine reader?  Me, not so much.  With some spare time on my hands I could happily flick through a magazine on food or music or interiors, but I’d never go out of my way to buy a magazine.  I have a blog reader set up (Feedly) so that I can catch up with all of my favourite blogs in one place when I get the chance, and that satiates my magazine reading itch.

Also, I don’t find WH Smith a fun place to shop.  I hate being hassled at the checkout to buy their special offer chocolate or bottled water, when I just came in to buy a magazine.  Just me?

My partner, on the other hand, has varied specialist interests.  Some of these include graphic design, photography, drumming, making music, gardening…  I could go on!  Anyway, he would buy a couple of magazines a month, and would have easily bought more but at £5+ a pop, it’s a pricey habit, so always limited himself.

A few months ago we saw an advert on TV for an online magazine service called Readly, a magazine subscription app that sounded too good to be true.  With Readly, you can access thousands of big name (and smaller) magazines from around the world, through your mobile, tablet or computer for a flat monthly fee, allowing you to read as much or as little as you want.  Too good to be true, right?

It sounded like there should be a catch, but we read a bit about Readly, and couldn’t see anything about a catch, so signed up for a free month long trial to try it out.  Here’s my Readly Review:

readly review

Readly Review

After the month long trial, we found we loved Readly so much that we signed up for a subscription.  And a good six or so months on of using Readly we still haven’t found the catch.  We’ve been paying the fixed monthly price of £7.99 a month for unlimited access to over 1900 new magazines (and up to 12 months of their back issues) from all over the world.  I’ve been enjoying flicking through whatever magazine takes my fancy, whenever the mood strikes, and I don’t feel guilty if I’m not paying my full attention to the magazine, or idly skimming through articles.  You can cancel a Readly subscription at any time, so you aren’t locked into any fixed term contracts either.

My partner and I have each set up our own profiles on Readly, which saves all of your favourites and offers recommendations based on what you’ve been reading.  You can save up to five profiles, which is handy for families.   Most magazines are available for reading on the day of publication, and you get a notification from Readly when one of your favourites has published a new issue.  My favourites on Readly include Delicious, Mollie Makes, Olive Magazine, and Veggie magazine, but there are so many different titles and types of magazines on offer (even kids titles) that it’s difficult to list them all here.

You can access Readly through a variety of platforms – from tablets, phones, laptops and desktop computers.  I’ve tried it on a laptop and tablet, but I think it works best on a tablet.  Flicking through a magazine is easy – if you have a tablet it’s simply a case of swiping the page over with your finger, whilst on a laptop it’s a case of clicking through to the next  page.

The magazine streams to your device, rather than being downloaded meaning you can read within seconds of opening up the app.  However you can also download magazines for when you are going to be somewhere without internet access – e.g. a bus or a train, so you can still access magazines on the go.

What I’m not 100% sure of is what the impact on the magazine publishing industry is.  From what I can understand Readly pay publishers based on the number of pages read and the time spent on each page.  So publishers get more money per magazine that is read rather than quickly flicked through.   This data also provides publishers with deep insights into how their content is being consumed, which is useful for deciding which features work and don’t work.

Whether this is a good or a bad thing, all in, I don’t know.  Perhaps for people like me that don’t buy magazines particularly often, then these magazines are gaining readers (and therefore eyes on the advertisements they run) that they wouldn’t normally have then Readly is a good thing for publishers.  What I don’t know is if you replace a magazine subscription for a Readly subscription, what the difference that has for the magazine publishing industry.

What I do is that all in all we’ve really been enjoying using Readly.  It’s saving us a little bit of money a month, has expanded our reading options massively, and means that we’re not using so much paper/resources, which is always a plus point.  And if you have Readly in lieu of a magazine subscription then it saves the magazine being posted in one of those annoying plastic magazine wrappers.

Have you used Readly?  What do you think of it?  And do you understand the magazine publishing industry better than I do?  Is Readly a good or bad thing for the publishing industry?

 

It goes without saying that I have no affiliation with Readly, I just wanted to share a find that I’ve been enjoying using.  Sponsored posts are always disclosed at the top of each post as such :)