how to learn something new

How To Learn Something New From The Comfort of Your Own Home

When I want to learn something new one of the first things I’ll do is check online to see if I can take a class.  Taking classes are fun, and a great way to meet like-minded people, but what I’ve found from trying to find or take classes is that:

a) the class you would most interested in taking isn’t running in your area

b)  a six week class sounds quite intense when you just want to learn at your own pace from the comfort of your own home

c)  sometimes or you just don’t feel like talking to a bunch of strangers towards the end of the day AND learn a new skill.

d) the cost of classes can be a bit of a barrier to taking part

If you can relate to any of these points then never fear!  I’ve been researching some of the best ways on how to learn something new at home:

4 Resources to Learn Something New At Home

Do Books

do books

Have you heard of Do Books?   I’ve only just come across them and have to say I’m a little bit smitten.  Produced by The Do Book Co, Do Books are a series of inspirational pocket guides on a variety of topics.  From advice on how to live more sustainably (such as Do Grow and Do Beekeeping), to advice for startups and entrepreneurs (such as the intriguingly titled Do Fly and Do Disrupt) Do have something for everyone to just get up and do something that catches your eye.

If you’re itching to learn something new – whether that’s the mastery of a new skill or craft – or need a simple mindshift, or a shot of inspiration,  the Do Books want to give you the tools and inspiration to try new things out in the most accessible manner possible.  Each book is fairly short, about 100 pages, as it focuses on the ‘doing’ rather than bogging you down in the background theory.  Of course, the background theory is useful to know, but sometimes that side of things can be a bit overwhelming when you just want to try something out to see if it’s for you.

Skillshare

how to do something new

If you learn by watching and doing rather than reading, then Skillshare is the place for you.  At Skillshare you can take online classes, where experts teach via video on a wide variety of topics and learn at your own pace.   There are over 15,000 classes to choose from.  I’ve tried learning to knit in the past, rather unsuccessfully, so this one looks good.

What I like best about Skillshare is that each class has a project for you to complete, which you then post on the Skillshare site.  This lets participants exchange feedback and learn together, making it feel like a class rather than just you sitting at home learning a new skill in isolation.  You can browse past projects here – it’s really interesting.

Craftsy

If you are looking to learn craft based skills then Craftsy is one to check out.  From sewing, drawing, photography, jewellery making, paper crafts and more, Craftsy covers all the main crafts with hundreds upon hundreds of high quality video classes.  Each class has a dedicated message board for asking questions and sharing projects, and tutors do check in on these boards and reply, giving it a nice community feel.

Creativebug

Similar to Craftsy, Creativebug offers high quality video lessons on craft based endeavours.  What makes it different is that they also run great quality classes specifically for kids, such as this class on finger knitting.  This is a great way to introduce kids to different crafts, and maybe crafts classes that aren’t necessarily running in your area.

Do you have any favourite learning resources?  Pop them in the comments below!

sourdough bread

Ten Things

sourdough bread

Hello hello!  How’s it going?  We’re on Easter holiday mode here, so there’s a lot of juggling of childcare and work and life going on.  So far we’ve managed to make it work and it has been fun!  I’m taking a little time off next week from all things blogging so things will be a little quieter around here, but before I head off I’ve got ten things that I’ve read/seen this last fortnight that you might enjoy too.

1.  I wrote a post for The Huffington Post this week asking if ethical clothing is expensive or have we just lost our sense of perspective?

2.  Marie Kondo tells us to ditch joyless items, but where are we sending them?

3.  Inspiring.  A nine year old girl files a lawsuit against the Indian government for inaction against climate change.  I wish I was that clued up when I was nine.

4.  “Just be grateful for these moments. A crying baby is nothing compared to what’s to come”.  A really lovely article on parenting.  As a parent of a one year old and a five year old, life is hard and using the bathroom alone is something I haven’t experienced in a very long time, but this made me realise what’s ahead, and why I’m in the easy bit.

5.  “For 18 years, I thought she was stealing my identity until I found her“.  A fascinating story on racial justice.

6.  Fake science was used to justify badger culls?

7.  Most new mums in America get 12 weeks unpaid maternity leave.  American mothers are now turning to crowdfunding to allow them to have some maternity leave.  Heartbreaking.

8.  Our bread making goes through peaks and troughs.  Right now it’s in a trough.  Erin makes me want to get back on it with her post on making sourdough bread (and her photo of her beautiful bread at the top of this post).

9.  The 5% tampon tax is being used to fund anti-abortionists.

10.  All the heart eyes for this top*.

And three things from the Moral Fibres archive:

1.  Sell your crap, pay your debt, do what you love.

2.  A handy vegetable planting calendar.

3.  Got black bananas?  Try making pancakes.

Until next time!