weekend links

Ten Things

Hello! There’s not been a lot to write about this week – it’s definitely been a slow news week, climate and environmental news wise ;) I joke – let’s dive straight in because it’s been a busy old week:

This week’s links:

1. After Scotland and Wales both declared climate emergencies this week, Westminster declared a climate emergency on Wednesday, making the UK parliament the first in the world to declare an “environment and climate emergency”. Massive thanks to all involved in Youth Strike 4 Climate and Extinction Rebellion for leading the way and to everyone who contacted their local MP pressing them on this issue. Now we await action.

2. Related: we just might be at a tipping point on how seriously the world treats climate change.

Sometimes it might seem like democracies, with their short political cycles, are unable to take the sort of action on climate change that requires long-term thinking… But democracies, by their inherent nature, are more accountable. That accountability, combined with commitments to global pacts like the Paris agreement, can spur them to act for the greater good. In its report, the UK’s Climate Change Committee said the country should “ideally begin redressing” its historical contributions to global emissions. Setting an ambitious net-zero goal would set an example for other countries to follow. The ease with which the climate-emergency motion passed in parliament shows that Britain’s political parties acknowledge the privileged position its economy commands thanks to its past consumption of fossil fuels.

3. What an interesting read on why your brain doesn’t register the words ‘climate change’.

Which phrase does a better job of grabbing people’s attention: “global warming” or “climate change”? According to recent neuroscience research, the answer is neither. If you want to get people to care, try “climate crisis,” suggests new research from an advertising consulting agency in New York. That phrase got a 60 percent greater emotional response from listeners than our old pal climate change.

4. In California, their latest weapon against climate change is as low-tech as they come – weeds.

5. Biodegradable isn’t the answer.

6. The Government’s fracking commissioner has resigned – citing environmental activists, and them being “highly successful” in encouraging the government to curb fracking as a key part of her resignation. Yesssss – what a victory!

7. Can you be a fashion lover and a feminist at the same time?

8 Climate change activists in the US have begun using a legal argument called the “necessity defense,” which justifies non-violent action taken to prevent a greater harm.

Under this argument, defendants can be acquitted of an act that is technically illegal. Like its better-known cousin, the doctrine of self-defense, it permits a judge and jury to consider context and morality.

9. Following along and offering virtual support with Mothers Rise Up. If you’re in London you can join them on 12th May.

10. Finally, this post by Paul Jarvis on keeping up with the Insta-Joneses is a great piece on consumerism and envy. Don’t have time to read it all – unfollow anyone on social media who makes you feel like you’re not good enough because you’re not wearing the latest clothes, or constantly on fancy holidays.

Wendy.x

Garden, Home and Garden

How to Compost In A Flat

Joy from Sustainable Jungle, a sustainable living blog, and podcast, is here today to share her how to compost in a flat knowledge with Moral Fibres readers. Joy has been composting in her flat for six months and is keen to share her multi-pronged attack so other flat dwellers can learn from her composting experience:


how to compost in an apartment

Our introduction to the concept of composting started in London in 2017. We had just been on an epic honeymoon through Africa. The time we spent in some of the most impressive and raw places on earth, like Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda and the Serengeti in Tanzania, delivered the harsh realisation that we, personally, were doing nothing truly positive for the environment and the ecosystems we care so much about.

So we started investigating living more sustainably, using the fantastic online resources available and made some important changes, one of which was composting. We thought we were rather smart because we discovered that “composting” in a flat in the London Borough of Camden is pretty simple – you collect your food scraps (including citrus and bones) in a caddy and leave it out on the street once a week for the council to collect it. Nice n Easy…

Then… we moved home to Australia. And we discovered very quickly that Australia is generally quite behind on making the most of food waste. We’d become so used to our empty, stink-free waste bins and found ourselves starting our composting journey from scratch. We also moved into a flat… which as it turns out, makes composting a little harder.

Six months on and there have been many iterations. We’ve certainly got a long way to go but we’re pretty happy with how far we’ve come. So much so that we are keen to share our current setup and experience with any flat dwellers looking to divert that valuable food waste from landfill, and perhaps even use some nutrient-rich compost on their own mini apartment garden.

How To Compost In A Flat

Aside from meal planning and better use of the full fruit or vegetable to reduce the amount of food scraps we need to get rid of in the first place, we are currently running the following setup:

Vermicomposting on the Balcony

composting in a flat
Joy’s vermicomposter

We didn’t want to overcommit to a worm farm until we were confident we wouldn’t kill our worm babies, so instead, we invested in a kid’s ‘learn to worm’ type vermicomposter*. I’m pleased to report that we have managed to keep our worms alive, even through a brutal Australian summer!

We love our worms, they make this amazing worm tea (stink free worm wee) which we use on our plants, both indoor and outdoor. This, along with the worm castings, really seem to make a huge difference to our plants’ health. This vermicomposter takes on about 10-20% of our weekly waste (given its quite small) and while worms can eat almost anything, there are some scraps they don’t eat so we had to find other solutions to deal with our remaining food scraps.

worm tea
Joy’s plants thrive on her worm tea

Bokashi Bins on the Balcony

how to compost in a flat
Joy’s bokashi bins

We had grand plans for our bokashi bins*. We were going to keep them inside to make life just that bit more convenient. They’re not supposed to smell and they’re supposed to convert things like bones, onions and orange peels (which worms don’t like) into something that worms can eat, or that can be easily composted in a traditional composter.

They indeed do a good job of converting hard-to-compost items, and they take on another 10-20% of our waste, but boy, do the ones we purchased stink! Our advice after this experience is to absolutely invest in good quality bokashi bins that have a really, really strong seal. Needless to say, our bokashi bins have been banished to the balcony and we’re looking for a suitable indoor version. Worth noting if you want to try this at home: you need at least 2 bokashi bins (for 2 people) as you need to alternate them – one bokashi does its fermenting job while the other one gets filled with scraps.

Local Community Garden, via ShareWaste App

food waste ideas

Probably the most impactful discovery for us was the ShareWaste App, which helped us find a community garden close by and in need of food scraps for their big composters. Our process is to collect our daily scraps in a bowl as we chop and cook. We then transfer to a big plastic bucket once a day and then take this bucket (with our remaining 70-80% of food scraps) to the community garden once a week.

It sounds like a big schlep but it really isn’t. It’s become part of our habit and the garden is near our local dog park where we take our little pooch anyway. We were thrilled to find that our family members have also used the ShareWaste app to find people in their local community who are now gratefully accepting their food scraps too. My mum takes her foods scraps across the road to her neighbour, and now has a new friend too!

So there you have it! I’d say we are intermediate apartment composters now. We still have some work to do both to reduce our waste but also to process our own. This is what we plan to tackle next:

  • Indoor Bokashi: We’re on a mission to find the best indoor, stink-free option
  • Make vegetable stock: This is a bit of a no-brainer, we just need to build the habit.
  • Dog poop composting: We now have a puppy and he is a poop machine. We have a somewhat zero waste approach now but it could be better.
  • Traditional composter: We’re really getting into balcony gardening so we plan to experiment with a traditional composter so we can keep some of that compost goodness for our own garden.

Composting in a flat sure is an art and unless you have heaps of space, it’s likely you need a multi-pronged approach, especially if you don’t have a balcony. I hope that sharing our experience has helped the aspiring flat composters out there, and if you have found a great way of dealing with food waste, please do share your tips on how to compost in a flat – both with us and those around you!