Life & Style, Special Occasions

The Best Ethical Easter Eggs For 2022 That Are Hard To Beat

Here are some truly cracking ethical Easter eggs, available online, that are hard to beat. From vegan-friendly to Fairtrade, to plastic-free and more – you’ll be sure to find an egg for you.

In order to help support the running costs of Moral Fibres, this post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. Moral Fibres may earn a small commission, at no extra cost to readers, on items that have been purchased through those links.

Easter is a mere bunny hop, skip, and a jump away – this year it falls on Sunday 17th of April. And if you have kids in your life (or a grown-up with a sweet tooth!) then no doubt your thoughts will soon be turning to Easter eggs.

Just a couple of years ago, plastic-free Easter eggs were almost impossible to find. Your only option was to make your own eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives. However, thanks to consumer pressure, many big-name brands have removed all single-use plastic from their Easter egg packaging. The Co-Op alone says their move will save 14 tonnes of plastic each year. It just goes to show you the impact that putting pressure on supermarkets can bring.

However, it’s not just the lack of single-use plastic that goes into making an ethical Easter egg. There are other factors as well. From vegan-friendly ingredients to palm-oil free chocolate, to organic and Fairtrade ingredients, there are lots that go into making up an ethical egg.

The Best Ethical Easter Eggs

Imager of a person holding an Easter egg, with a blue text box that says the best ethical Easter eggs available right now

To help you out, I’ve rounded up the best ethical Easter eggs for both kids and adults that deliver on ethics and taste.

Happi Oat Milk Egg

happi oat milk chocolate easter egg

Happi’s Oat Milk Chocolate Easter Egg* is dairy-free, making it suitable for both vegans and vegetarians. It’s plastic-free. And it is gluten-free and soya-free. In terms of nuts, it is nut-free, but it is packed in a facility that also handles nuts, peanuts, and sesame, amongst other allergens. Therefore, if severe allergies feature in your life do check with Happi to make sure this is the right option for you.

Whilst it’s free from a lot of things, it’s certainly not taste-free. This deliciously rich and creamy salted caramel flavour egg is sure to be a hit with both kids and grown-ups. It’s the high cacao content that gives it this delicious taste. And this means less sugar is required to get the desired taste. In fact, Happi says they use 35% less sugar compared to other leading brands.

Happi is also proud to be 100% slave free. They say that they buy their cacao directly from farmers and growers with a full ‘farm-to-bar’ supply chain. This means that Happi knows who grows the cacao beans and what they get paid.

Happi also donates 1% of its annual net sales revenues to causes, such as mental health organisations.

Buy Happi’s Oat Milk Chocolate ethical Easter Egg from The Vegan Kind* for £9.49*.

Cocoa Loco

Cocoa Loco’s range of Easter products* are all organic, Fairtrade-certified, palm oil-free, and handmade in West Sussex.

Packaging is also important to Cocoa Loco, with all their products being plastic-free. Products are either packaged in cardboard, or in compostable bags.

In particular, these ethical Easter eggs, pictured above, are packaged in a bunny-shaped cardboard box and a compostable bag that will biodegrade at industrial sites or at home. As well as a milk chocolate option, vegan-friendly dark chocolate options are available too.

As well as kid-friendly Easter eggs, you can also find stunning eggs for grownups too, all with the same ethical and eco-friendly credentials. This makes for a perfect treat to nibble on after your Easter lunch!

Buy Cocoa Loco eggs from Ethical Superstore from £5.99*. You can also find a wide range on their Not On Their High St store*, such as the moustache egg in the main photo.

Moo Free

moo free ethical Easter egg

Moo Free’s range of ethical Easter eggs* is a great budget-friendly find for kids. They are a palm-oil free chocolate company, and all their chocolate is dairy-free, gluten-free and vegetarian and vegan friendly. This easter egg is finished with vegan-friendly marshmallows, but other eggs in their range come complete with a surprise inside them.

Whilst not Fairtrade certified, instead Moo Free purchases Rainforest Alliance Certified Cocoa for this product to help support farmers and sustainable farming.

The only downside is that Moo Free’s eggs disappointingly aren’t plastic-free. However Moo Free say the insert in their Easter egg packaging is made from 95% recycled plastic and is recyclable again.

Buy Moo Free eggs from The Vegan Kind from £2.99*.

Booja Booja

booja booja palm oil free easter egg

If you are looking for an ethical Easter egg for the grown-up in your life, then try Booja Booja*. These seriously pretty reusable egg-shaped boxes contain a selection of Booja’s Booja’s deliciously decadent and vegan-friendly chocolate truffles.

What makes these ethically made truffles extra special is that they are certified organic and free of palm oil. They are also dairy-free, wheat-free, gluten-free, and free of any genetically modified ingredients.

What’s more, each handmade and handpainted box is created by Kashmiri artisans in India, which helps traditional skills to flourish.

You might be wondering about whether their chocolate is Fairtrade. Booja Booja says that because of their commitment to using only organic and vegan ingredients, it is not currently possible for them to use only Fairtrade suppliers. They, therefore, do not use the Fairtrade logo. However, they do say that trading fairly and ethically is essential to how they operate and is reflected in the relationships they have with their suppliers across the globe.

Buy Booja Booja eggs from Ethical Superstore from £9.99*.

Tony Chocolonely

Tony Chocolonely egg hunt

If you need ethical chocolate eggs for your Easter egg hunt or are just looking to gift delicious tasting chocolate in completely plastic-free packaging then Tony Chocolonely* is a great ethical choice. This B Corp and FairTrade certified brand knows how to make seriously good chocolate.

Free from palm oil, GM ingredients, artificial preservatives and artificial flavours – although not dairy-free – each egg comes individually wrapped in recyclable foil. The egg box itself is made of fully recyclable cardboard.

Tony’s Chocolonely mission is to end slavery in the chocolate industry.  As such, their commitment to slave free and Fairtrade cocoa enables farmers to earn a living income, ensures traceable beans and allows them to work directly with farmers to eliminate the abuses in the industry.

Buy Tony Chocolonely eggs from Oxfam Online* or Ethical Superstore* for £4.49.

Plamil Organic Easter Egg

Plamil organic easter egg

IF you are looking for an ethical Easter egg that is produced in a factory that does not handle gluten, dairy or nuts, then Plamil’s organic Easter egg* is the one to go for. As well as a dairy-free egg, it also comes with a sharing bag of dairy-free chocolate eggs.

What’s to love about this Easter egg is that it’s certified organic and is palm-oil free. Plamil use only Fairtrade certified cocoa, and they avoid child slave labour in their supply change. What’s more, the egg comes with no plastic packaging, and it’s made in the UK in a factory powered by renewable energy.

Buy Plamil’s Organic Easter Egg from Ethical Superstore* for £3.99.

As I track down more ethical Easter eggs, I’ll be sure to add them here. In the meantime, enjoy!

Main image used c/o Cocoa Loco

Home and Garden, Natural Cleaning

How To Make Pine Infused Vinegar For Cleaning

Wondering how to make fresh-smelling pine-infused vinegar for cleaning? Read on for my full how-to.

I love making my own cleaning sprays. I have made my own herb-infused vinegar for cleaning before, but I’ve never made any with pine.

I really love the smell of pine. It’s a fresh smell I associate with cleaning, and as such, I quite often use pine essential oil in my homemade cleaning products. However, I’ve never had any fresh pine to hand to try it out in my cleaning products.

And then recently I was walking in my local country park and I noticed a load of pine branches on the ground. I wasn’t sure if some trees had been felled, or whether some of the strong winds had knocked the branches off. Either way, I picked up a couple of small branches that were lying on the ground and decided it was time to make pine-infused vinegar.

Like any infused vinegar, it’s incredibly easy to make. Here’s the full how to, so you can make it too!

How To Make Pine Infused Vinegar For Cleaning

Image of a jar of pine needles, with a blue text box that says how to make pine-infused vinegar for cleaning with.

You Will Need

To make pine-infused vinegar, you will need:

  • A clean and dry glass jar with a lid
  • A few pine branches – just enough to fill your jar
  • White spirit vinegar
  • Optional – orange, lemon, grapefruit or lime peel
  • A clean, dry spray bottle

Method

Gather your pine branches. Then give them a shake to remove any bugs and beasties that might be residing in the branches.

Next, pop the pine branches into your jar. You may need to cut them into smaller sections using scissors, if your branches are too long.

If you have any citrus peel, feel free to add these too for a extra fresh scent burst.

Next, pour in your vinegar until it reaches the top. Your branches and peel, if you added any, should be submerged.

Finally, pop the lid on, and let the ingredients infuse for at least two weeks in a cool, dark place. The cupboard under your kitchen sink is an ideal place for this. Two weeks would be the bare minimum. For stronger pine scented vinegar, leave the pine steeping for longer. I’ve left herbs and citrus infusing for as much as six months, for stronger smelling infused vinegar.

How To Use Pine-Infused Vinegar

Once you’ve finished infusing your vinegar, use a colander or seive, and strain the mixture into a measuring jug. Place the pine branches (and citrus peel, if you used it) into your compost bin.

Next, fill your clean, dry spray bottle half way with the pine infused vinegar. Then top the bottle up with cooled boiled water, so that is it a 50:50 vinegar/water mix. Pop any unused vinegar back in your jar, and pop the lid on.

Any unused and undiluted vinegar will last indefinitely. When made with cooled boiled water, your cleaning spray will have a shelf-life of around 6 to 8 weeks. If you use water straight from the tap, the shelf life is considerably less, so I would always recommend boiling and cooling your water first.

Spray your cloth with the spray, and you can get wiping, for a home that will smell forest fresh!

What Can I Clean?

pine infused cleaner

You can use your pine-infused vinegar to clean almost every area of your home. However, do note there are a few applications that vinegar is not suitable for use.

White vinegar isn’t suitable for cleaning natural stone, or granite, marble, quartz, or similar. This is because vinegar can be corrosive to these materials, and may etch the surface.

Metallic paint is another no-no. So avoid using vinegar-based cleaners to clean your car. 

Also, do not mix your cleaner with cleaning products that contain bleach or hydrogen peroxide, as doing so can release poisonous gases that can harm your airways.

I would always recommending reading my guide on everything you need to know about cleaning with white vinegar, as it talks you through all these points and more.

Is Pine-Infused Vinegar Pet Safe?

I have read conflicting reports on whether pine is toxic to cats or not. From what I have read, pine trees are not toxic to cats or dogs, however pine essential oil is toxic to cats and dogs.

My thoughts are that infusing pine in vinegar means the pine is diluted to a concentration that shouldn’t harm your pets. Especially so, when you add water to make your cleaning spray. However, if you have pets, then I would encourage you to carry out your own research, to decide if using this cleaner is the right option for you.

If you do make the cleaner, make sure your jar is kept sealed and away from pets to avoid ingestion.

Printable Version

Here’s the printable version of this recipe, if you would like to print it out.

How to Make Pine-Infused Vinegar For Cleaning

Make your home smell forest fresh with this easy guide to making your own pine-infused vinegar.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 2 bottles

Ingredients

  • 3 handfuls Pine branches – just enough to fill your jar
  • 1 bottle White spirit vinegar
  • 1 handful Optional – orange, lemon, grapefruit or lime peel

Instructions

  1. Gather your pine branches. Then give them a shake to remove any bugs and beasties that might be residing in the branches.

  2. Next, pop the pine branches into your jar. You may need to cut them into smaller sections using scissors, if your branches are too long.

  3. If you have any citrus peel, feel free to add these too for a extra fresh scent burst.

  4. Next, pour in your vinegar until it reaches the top. Your branches and peel, if you added any, should be submerged.

  5. Finally, pop the lid on, and let the ingredients infuse for at least two weeks in a cool, dark place. The cupboard under your kitchen sink is an ideal place for this. Two weeks would be the bare minimum. For stronger pine scented vinegar, leave the pine steeping for longer. I’ve left herbs and citrus infusing for as much as six months, for stronger smelling infused vinegar.

Recipe Notes

Once you’ve finished infusing your vinegar, use a colander or seive, and strain the mixture into a measuring jug. Place the pine branches (and citrus peel, if you used it) into your compost bin.

Next, fill your clean, dry spray bottle half way with the pine infused vinegar. Then top the bottle up with cooled boiled water, so that is it a 50:50 vinegar/water mix. Pop any unused vinegar back in your jar, and pop the lid on.

Any unused and undiluted vinegar will last indefinitely. When made with cooled boiled water, your cleaning spray will have a shelf-life of around 6 to 8 weeks. If you use water straight from the tap, the shelf life is considerably less, so I would always recommend boiling and cooling your water first.

Spray your cloth with the spray, and you can get wiping, for a home that will smell forest fresh!