Arts & Crafts, Children, Families, Life & Style

How To Make Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives

eco-friendly easter egg alternatives
eco-friendly easter egg alternatives

Here is a great eco-friendly easter egg alternative you can make, or get your kids to make on a wet afternoon.

I’m not too big on giving my daughter too much chocolate.  She gets a little bit, but we do try to limit how much she eats.  The influx of chocolate at Easter, therefore, makes me feel a little uncomfortable.  

However, It’s not just the chocolate.  Easter eggs are one of the most overly packaged items on the shop shelf.  A typical egg will be housed in an elaborate box, a large plastic case, and be wrapped in foil.  The egg itself will typically contain a plastic bag full of yet more sweets.

Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternatives?

Trying to come up with a healthy eco-friendly Easter egg alternative called for some creative thinking and head-scratching.  After a bit of brainstorming, I found a set of four wooden two-part eggs for a few pounds on eBay.  They don’t seem to be available anymore, but I have found some cardboard ones*.

 Then armed with a bundle of scrap fabric and a lot of glue I decoupaged the eggs to create some eggs that can be filled with any item of your choosing –  such as crayons or healthy treats.  The best part is that these can be refilled, and will last for many Easters to come, making these a fantastic eco-friendly Easter egg alternative!

decoupage easter eggs

How to Make an Eco-Friendly Easter Egg Alternative

It’s really easy to make this eco-friendly easter egg alternative and it’s a really fun activity for kids.  

This post contains affiliate links denoted by *, which contributes to the running costs of the site.  

You will need

how to make decoupage easter eggs

PVA Glue

Water

Scrap Fabrics

Ribbon/Trim

Decoupage Eggs*

Instructions

To make these eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives:

  • Cut some scrap fabric into 1cm squared squares.
  • Mixed 1 part PVA glue with 1 part water in a bowl.  Then give the glue and water a good mix with your finger or an old paintbrush.
  • Separate your wooden eggs into two parts and sit them on a protected surface.
  • Dunk your fabric squares into the PVA glue/water mix, giving them a good soaking.  Squeeze out any excess water/glue then apply to your egg.  Smooth out any creases with your finger as you go.
  • Make sure you cover up all bits of wood/cardboard with your fabric.
  • Leave to dry overnight.
  • Glue a ribbon or trim in place if desired.

I tried a patchwork effect on my first egg.  However I wasn’t so keen on how it came out, so I stuck to one fabric per egg.

You can fill these with sweet treats, dried fruit, or other ideas.

Other Alternatives to Decoupage

decorated easter eggs

If decoupage isn’t for you, then there are lots of other ways to make eco-friendly easter egg alternatives using the decoupage egg blanks.

You could also paint the eggs using acrylic paints, or draw on them using sharpies or gel pens.  However, my painting skills are not up to scratch, which is why I went for decoupage!  If you’re a dab hand with a paintbrush or pen, or your kids would rather paint than decoupage,  then here are some stylish examples of painted eggs that I found on Blank Goods:

easy easter craft

You could also use washi tape, like these ones from Bliss Bloom:

washi tape easter eggs

If you’re handy with a crochet hook, you could even make these lovely eggs, spotted at Red Heart:

crochet easter eggs

These would be great for a kid’s egg hunt!

There you have it, lots of lovely eco-friendly Easter egg alternatives to traditional chocolate Easter eggs that have the added bonus of being a bit healthier too!

Of course, if you are looking for chocolate Easter eggs, then do check out my guide to the best ethical Easter eggs. Here I’ve got the best plastic-free, Fairtrade, vegan-friendly Easter eggs, and more.

If you’re also looking for Easter lunch ideas, then do check out my vegan Easter lunch ideas post for some inspiration.

Ethical Fashion, Life & Style

Ethical High Street Shops

ethical high street

Ever wondered how ethical and environmentally friendly our high-street shops are?  Ethical Consumer has put together an interactive table of ethical high street shops, rated on their environmental, ethical, and political performance.  I’ve personally found that it is really useful when making decisions about where to shop.

Ethical High Street Shops?

ethical high street shops

I strongly believe that as consumers it’s our job to be as informed as we can, so I’ve found this table on ethical high street shops quite enlightening and surprising.

Here’s the full rundown:

ethical high street shops

I do have an updated version of this ethical guide to the high street here.

As far as ethical high street shops go, I certainly wouldn’t have guessed that Sainsbury’s fairtrade clothing would be rated lower than Primark.  That is a huge surprise. 

I also wouldn’t have guessed that John Lewis would be rated only 0.5 points above Primark.  Again, John Lewis is one of those shops that I would have expected more from.

And most surprising of all – that New Look would be one of the most ethical performers on the High Street.  And Bon Marche?  I don’t think I’ve ever stepped foot in a Bon Marche shop – it’s certainly not one that is well known to me.

Where Is The Best Place to Shop?

Of course, this isn’t to say that New Look is an ethical high street shop.  Ethical Consumer say any score below 10 is considered poor.  This suggests that the high street still has a very long way to go on ethics.

I personally would try to stick to shopping for secondhand clothes, or for ethical brands, where possible. Although I do realise ethical clothing isn’t always the most accessible – both in terms of inclusivity and in terms of price. If you do need to shop on the high street then it’s certainly not something to feel guilty about.

Were there any surprises here for you? Where do you shop for ethical goods on the high street?

PS: Found this post useful?  Since I initially put this post together back in 2013 I’ve written extensively about shopping ethically.  Here’s a guide on how to shop ethically, a guide to men’s ethical clothing companies, and a guide on how to shop ethically on a budget.  I’ve also got information on where to buy ethical sleepwear, ethical tights and socksethical shoes, and even men’s underwear and women’s underwear!