Home and Garden, Natural Cleaning

Homemade Cleaning Wipes Solution For Speedy Cleaning

Want to know how to make a homemade cleaning wipes solution? Read on!

What household chore do you hate the most? Cleaning the bathroom is the least favoured task in our house. My partner and I split the household chores, and that works well for us. That is until it comes to cleaning the bathroom. Specifically, our upstairs bathroom frequented by our children. Honestly, the state they leave it in would make you weep sometimes. Weep, I tell you!

I’ve been thinking about how we can make cleaning the bathroom easier. But also give my children greater autonomy. And I thought cleaning wipes. I could make a non-toxic homemade cleaning wipes solution, and leave a jar in the bathroom. This means anyone in the house (including my kids) can wipe down the surfaces in between big cleans. That’s the dream, anyway!

The wipes turned out to be so useful, that I made an extra jar for the kitchen. And so useful, that I wanted to share the recipe for my homemade cleaning wipes solution with you today. Sharing is caring, after all!

homemade cleaning wipes solution uk

What’s Wrong With Conventional Cleaning Wipes?

Why I am not just buying a packet of wipes from the supermarket?

For a start, I’m trying to reduce the single-use plastic we use in our house. Many conventional cleaning wipes are made of non-biodegradable plastic. Even the wipes marketed as biodegradable and flushable shouldn’t actually be flushed. These flushed wipes are behind 93% of blockages in UK sewers. In short, they’re an environmental disaster.

And secondly, scientists have warned that some conventional cleaning products could be as bad for your lungs as smoking 20 cigarettes a day. This homemade cleaning wipes solution means I avoid single-use plastic and reduce the number of harsh chemicals in our home. Double win!

How to Make A Homemade Cleaning Wipes Solution

homemade cleaning wipes solution

Please note, this cleaning wipes solution isn’t suitable for use on granite, marble, quartz, or any other kind of natural stone. This is because vinegar can be corrosive to natural stone. Keep reading if you have natural stone because I’ve got a stone-safe recipe for you further down the page.

You Will Need

  • A 750 ml jar or similar airtight container
  • 125 ml cooled boiled water
  • 125 ml white vinegar (this is where I buy my white vinegar in bulk)
  • 5 drops of lemon essential oil
  • 5 drops of lavender essential oil
  • 4 drops of lemongrass essential oil
  • 1 teaspoon dishwashing liquid
  • Clean dry reusable cloths

Depending on the size of your jar and the size of your cloths, the number of cloths you will need will vary. I used some old Cheeky Wipes terry squares I had leftover from when my daughter was little. Here I found nine Cheeky Wipes fit in my jar perfectly. However, you could use any fabric scraps or kitchen cloths to hand. You could even cut up an old towel that’s seen better days.

Method

In a measuring jug, mix the water, vinegar, dishwashing liquid, and essential oils together.

Place your dry cloths into the clean dry jar.

Next pour the solution over the cloths, making sure you try to cover the cloths evenly. Job done!

If the cloths feel too dry, make a little more solution and pour over. The goal is that your cloths feel moist to the touch, not completely sodden.

How To Use

Whenever you want to clean, simply take a cloth from the jar. You may need to squeeze out some of the homemade cleaning wipes solution if it feels too wet.

Wipe down surfaces (remember, not any natural stone surfaces). Once you’re done, pop the wipe in the wash with the rest of your laundry.

When the jar is empty, make up a new batch of solution.

Because the cleaning wipes solution is made using water, it does have a relatively short shelf life. I therefore wouldn’t use water straight from the tap – boiling the water helps prolong the shelf life. As such, the wipes should last up to four weeks or so in the jar. If the solutions starts to smell bad, or the cloths start to look mouldy before then, then wash your cloths and start again.

A Stone Safe Cleaning Wipes Alternative

cleaning wipes solution

If vinegar isn’t your thing, or if you have natural stone, then let me show you how to make a vinegar-free homemade cleaning wipes solution using liquid Castile soap. Washing up liquid also works fine if you don’t have any castile soap.

  • 250 ml cooled boiled water
  • 2 teaspoons liquid Castile soap or washing up liquid
  • 10 drops lavender essential oil
  • 4 drops tea tree essential oil

Follow the same steps as before, again making up a little more solution if your cloths feel too dry.

Do The Homemade Cleaning Wipes Disinfect?

These homemade wipes don’t disinfect, they are cleaning wipes. This means they are ideal for wiping down dirt and dust from surfaces, such as toothpaste smears and soap scum. However, they don’t kill germs in the same way that disinfectants do.

The good news is that I am currently working on some homemade disinfecting wipes using 70% isopropyl alcohol. I’ll be sure to share the recipe on Moral Fibres once I’m happy with it.

I’m really big on natural cleaning, so I have a ton of other natural cleaning products to make. Right this way my friend!

Fashion, Life & Style

The Best Ethical Slippers for Cosy Toes

Looking for a pair of eco-friendly or ethical slippers? Good news then, I’ve rounded up my favourites for you!

With all this staying at home, ethical slippers are on my mind.

This winter it feels like staying comfortable and cosy has never been as important as it has now. I was updating my guide to ethical pyjamas and loungewear and my guide to ethical socks and thought why stop here. I, therefore, carried out some research and found some of the best eco-friendly and ethical slippers for both women and men available in the UK right now.

What I’ve found is that much like the ethical clothing market, the ethical slippers market is small. To make things harder, this already small market has been hit by Brexit. Many ethical slipper choices are made in the EU and shipped to the UK. However, because of Brexit, many EU-based retailers have stopped shipping to the UK.

For those EU-based retailers that are still shipping to the UK, import duties must now be paid on purchases from the EU coming into the UK. This means that when you order from the EU you are hit with these hidden charges. As such, for this guide, I’ve focused on what’s accessible within the UK. It therefore might be small, but I’ve managed to cover all bases I hope!

Slipper Ethics

I’m mindful that everyone has different ethics when it comes to clothing and footwear. As such, this guide has been designed to be a starting-off point for you to research the most sustainable option for you.

Some of the slippers I’ve recommended are vegan-friendly. For these, I’ve sourced those made using recycled plastic bottles, rather than virgin plastic. And for those looking for plastic-free slippers, I’ve sourced ethical slippers made considerately using wool, suede, and/or sheepskin. Where sheepskin has been used, I’ve focused on those upcycling byproducts from other industries.

Guide to Ethical Slippers

This post contains affiliate links, denoted by *. This doesn’t affect the price you pay for items or your consumer rights, such as your right to return items.  It just means that I get a very tiny percentage of the sale price if you buy anything via the link.  This helps cover blog costs, such as my web hosting.

Egos Copenhagen

fairtrade slippers uk

Egos wool slippers (£39 – available in the UK from Wild Swans) are ethically made by hand in Nepal by skilled craftswomen. In fact, Egos have been certified by The World Fair Trade Organization.

Each pair takes time and skill to make. As such, each employee can only make 2 pairs of shoes a day. It’s definitely a case of quality over quantity.

The raw wool is dyed with environmentally friendly colors, before being molded into the slipper shape. Another inner layer of felt is then added, for extra comfort. Finally, the outer suede sole is stitched on these incredibly cosy slippers.

Gumbies

Gumbies sustainable slippers

Each pair of Gumbies unisex vegan slippers (£35) are made from recycled plastic derived from post-consumer plastic bottles. In fact, 8 bottles are used to make each pair. What’s more, the soles are even made from recycled rubber.

Rather than stop there, the insoles are made from beans. Yes, beans, you read that correctly! The soft foam Gumbies use for their insoles are made from 100% Castor Bean, a naturally derived material.

Mercredy

ethical slippers uk

Mercredy’s eco-friendly slippers* (£34.95) are handcrafted in Spain using recycled plastic bottles. They use plastic bottles collected from the ocean to create the heavy-duty felt fabric for the slippers. In fact each slipper is made from at least 2 recycled bottles.

This fabric, which is used in both the upper and lining for the slippers is certified 100% recycled by the Global Recycling Standard. What’s more, the sole is made from natural rubber, which is sustainably sourced.

My verdict? Mercredy make for a great pair vegan slippers.

Onaie

Onaie’s beautiful felt slippers* (£31.49) are made and finished in the Polish Highlands using age-old techniques. Onaie says “we take the ethical manufacture of footwear very seriously. We know our craftswomen, we know their business practices and we work side by side with our suppliers to ensure ongoing ethical, social and environmental compliance.” 

These beautiful slippers would make such a lovely ethical gift idea for someone special, or as a treat to yourself.

The Small Home

guide to eco-friendly and sustainable slippers

The Small Home sells beautiful handmade embroidered slippers. Each unique pair is made from the softest shearling sheepskin, using off-cuts from Rolls Royce car interiors to ensure the highest grade skins and to minimise waste.

The Small Home say “The natural materials we use to make our sheepskin slippers are designed to last and offer a sustainable and ethical alternative to fast fashion. Our hand-stitched sheepskin slippers are an everyday luxury suited to slow, mindful living.”

What Else Can I Do?

The single most eco-friendly choice of slippers are the ones you already have. If your existing pair have started to wear out, why not look at how you can repair them?

Learning some basic techniques to repair holes and tears is a great first step. Another useful tool for fixing slippers, depending on what they are made of, is Sugru. I’m obsessed with it!

Beyond your own ethical choices you can also help to engender change on the High St. One way you can do this is to ask High St brands who make their clothes (see Fashion Revolution for their great resources).  This will help press for transparency and sustainability on the High Street. 

Even if you can’t afford to shop for ethical slippers, you can also support the brands that align with your values.  Even if you can’t afford to purchase ethical alternatives, you can also like, comment on, and share their social media posts to help boost their exposure.